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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

An Israeli airstrike hits the high-rise building housing The Associated Press's offices in Gaza City on Saturday. The attack came roughly an hour after the Israeli military ordered people to evacuate the building. Hatem Moussa/AP hide caption

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Hatem Moussa/AP

Journalist Masha Borzunova during a taping of the show Fake News in TV Rain's Moscow studios. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR

Russian Show 'Fake News' Wages Lone Battle Against The Kremlin's TV Propaganda

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President Biden answers a question about the conflict between Israel and Hamas militants on Thursday after delivering remarks at the White House on the Colonial Pipeline incident. His public comments on the situation in the Middle East have been limited while the administration says it is focused on diplomacy behind the scenes. T.J. Kirkpatrick/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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T.J. Kirkpatrick/Pool/Getty Images

Biden Takes Muted Approach To Violence In Israel And Gaza

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In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, members at the Beijing Aerospace Control Center celebrate after China's Tianwen-1 probe successfully landed on Mars, at the center in Beijing on Saturday. Jin Liwang/AP hide caption

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Jin Liwang/AP

A Walmart store in Derry, N.H., seen in November 2020. The company says fully vaccinated customers need not wear masks, and vaccinated workers won't need to wear them starting Tuesday. The company won't require proof of status. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

A girl and her father wear facemasks while they push their bikes last summer in Hermosa Beach, Los Angeles. There aren't yet coronavirus vaccines approved in the U.S. for kids under 12 — which means they should keep masking, according to the CDC. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Then-President Donald Trump holds up a Bible outside St. John's Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C., last June after days of anti-racism protests against police brutality. President Biden has rescinded several orders Trump made during his last year in office, including moves to protect Confederate statues targeted by protesters. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

After the CDC shifted this week to less restrictive mask guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some leaders in the public health world felt blindsided. While some people rejoiced, others say they feel the change has come too soon. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Joel Greenberg, then a Seminole County, Fla., tax collector talks to the Orlando Sentinel during a September 2019 interview at his office in Lake Mary, Fla. Joe Burbank/TNS/ABACA via Reuters Connect hide caption

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Joe Burbank/TNS/ABACA via Reuters Connect

Coronavirus Variant From India Appears To Be Spreading In The U.S.

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The New York Yankees, including manager Aaron Boone, are back to wearing masks after the team reported eight "breakthrough" COVID-19 cases this week. Julio Aguilar/Getty Images hide caption

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Julio Aguilar/Getty Images

Left: A drawing of a human with a cow head holding a needle menacingly toward a child as he administers a tainted smallpox vaccination was meant to sow distrust of smallpox vaccines. Right: Protesters against COVID-19 vaccinations hold a rally in Sydney in February. Bettman/Getty Images; Brook Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettman/Getty Images; Brook Mitchell/Getty Images

Jacob Simona stands by his burning car during clashes with Israeli Arabs and police in the mixed Jewish-Palestinian city of Lod, Israel, on Tuesday. Heidi Levine/AP hide caption

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Heidi Levine/AP

'Creating The Enemy Of The Future': How 2 Palestinians See The Clash With Israel

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A crowd demonstrates against the Tokyo Olympics earlier this month in Tokyo. With less than three months remaining until the Olympics, concern lingers in Japan over the feasibility of hosting such a huge event during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuichi Yamazaki/Getty Images

Opposition To Tokyo Games Grows Heated Amid COVID Concerns

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A bartender mixes a drink inside a bar last week in San Francisco. The latest retail sales data out on Friday showed an increase in sales at restaurants and bars as more people venture out amid the continued reopening of the U.S. economy. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images