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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

Stanislav Petrov, a former Soviet military officer, poses at his home in 2015 near Moscow. In 1983, he was on duty when the Soviet Union's early warning satellite indicated the U.S. had fired nuclear weapons at his country. He suspected, correctly, it was a false alarm and did not immediately send the report up the chain of command. Petrov died at age 77. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Sam Clovis, a conservative talk radio host who ran President Trump's campaign in Iowa, has been nominated to a top scientific post at the Department of Agriculture even though he lacks a science background. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Trump's Nominee To Be USDA's Chief Scientist Is Not A Scientist

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Chief David Beautiful Bald Eagle during the opening of the Days of '76 Museum in Deadwood, S.D. Bald Eagle died on Friday at the age of 97. Tom Griffith/Rapid City Journal via AP hide caption

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Tom Griffith/Rapid City Journal via AP

David Bald Eagle, Lakota Chief, Musician, Cowboy And Actor, Dies At 97

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Gen. John F. Campbell, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, speaks during a ceremony in Kabul on Aug. 26. Campbell is overseeing the U.S. drawdown in the country after 13 years of war. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

Afghanistan's Way Forward: A Talk With Gen. John Campbell, Decoded

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Earth, Wind & Fire onstage in 1979. Ed Perlstein/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Perlstein/Redferns/Getty Images

The Song That Never Ends: Why Earth, Wind & Fire's 'September' Sustains

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