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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

A resident receives a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a health center in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Jan. 13. This week, Indonesia started a program to give booster shots to the elderly and people at risk of severe disease. Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Booster longevity: Data reveals how long a third shot protects

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A logo sign outside of a Carhartt retail store location in Cherry Hill, New Jersey on April 11, 2020. The company is facing blowback among some conservatives for its decision to press ahead with a vaccine mandate for its employees. Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters hide caption

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Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters

Cori Berg is executive director of the Hope Day School early childhood program in Dallas. Cooper Neill for NPR hide caption

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Cooper Neill for NPR

Parents and caregivers of young children say they've hit pandemic rock bottom

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The Villa Aurora in Rome housing the only mural by Caravaggio failed to find a bidder in an auction Tuesday. Riccardo Antimiani/ANSA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Riccardo Antimiani/ANSA/AFP via Getty Images

The Theodore Roosevelt Equestrian Statue is shown in front of the American Museum of Natural History's Central Park West entrance in New York City in 2020. Removal began this week. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

A pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Now, a nonprofit group said it has raised around $900,000 for the alleged rioters, but some of their families are raising questions about how the money is being spent. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Experts see 'red flags' at nonprofit raising big money for Capitol riot defendants

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A photo of Tony Tsantinis hangs in a collage set up for a celebration of his life on the final day that Athens Pizza in Brimfield, Mass., was open for business. Tsantinis, who owned the pizzeria for many years, died of COVID-19 last month when efforts to find space at a hospital that could offer him a higher level of care could not be found. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

17 hospitals had no room for this COVID patient. He later died waiting for dialysis

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The island of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai as imaged by the satellite company Maxar on Jan. 6 (left) and Jan. 18 (right). It was obliterated in a volcanic eruption that scientists estimate was 10 megatons in size. Satellite image ©2022 Maxar Technologies hide caption

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Satellite image ©2022 Maxar Technologies

NASA scientists estimate Tonga blast at 10 megatons

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This stock image shows a baby and father playing at home. New research finds that babies judge the relationship between two people by whether or not they willingly share saliva. freemixer/Getty Images hide caption

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freemixer/Getty Images

Even babies and toddlers know that swapping saliva is a sure sign of love

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The newest Girl Scout cookie, Adventurefuls, has fallen victim to supply chain and labor disruptions. The brownie-inspired treat features a caramel-flavored creme and a dash of sea salt. Bill Chappell/NPR hide caption

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Bill Chappell/NPR

Tongan Foreign Minister Fekitamoeloa 'Utoikamanu (right) is accompanied by Australian High Commissioner to Tonga Rachael Moore as they receive a Royal Australian Air Force C-17A Globemaster III aircraft delivering Australian aid at Fuaʻamotu International Airport on Thursday. Handout, Australian Defense Force/AP hide caption

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Handout, Australian Defense Force/AP
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Supreme Court hears arguments on campaign finance law, issues statement on NPR report

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Carl Erik Fisher, psychiatrist and author of The Urge: A History of Addiction. Beowulf Sheehan/Beowulf Sheehan hide caption

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Beowulf Sheehan/Beowulf Sheehan

'The Urge' says calling addiction a disease is misleading

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Zara Rutherford, 19, carries the Belgian and British flags on the tarmac after landing her Shark ultralight plane at the Kortrijk airport in Belgium, on Thursday at the completion of a record-breaking solo circumnavigation. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

19-year-old lands in Belgium, becoming youngest woman to fly solo around the world

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a news conference Tuesday on Capitol Hill following a Senate Democratic Caucus meeting on voting rights and the filibuster. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Schumer insists failed votes on voting rights and filibuster were right thing to do

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Former Minneapolis police officers J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao (left to right) are set to go on trial in federal court charged with violating George Floyd's civil rights. AP hide caption

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AP

A poll worker in Austin, Texas, stamps a voter's 2020 ballot before dropping it into a secure box. Ahead of the state's March primary, local election officials in Texas are starting to deal with the effects of the new GOP-backed voting law. Sergio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Why Texas election officials are rejecting hundreds of vote-by-mail applications

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Gary Chambers Jr., pictured here in a file photo, is running against U.S. Sen. John Kennedy of Louisiana. His first campaign video, "37 Seconds," features him smoking a blunt and discussing marijuana arrests and policy. Melinda Deslatte/AP hide caption

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Melinda Deslatte/AP