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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

This painting of Virginia Hall hangs in one of the main hallways near the entrance of CIA headquarters. The painting shows her making radio contact with London from an old barn in France to request supplies and personnel. Power for her radio was provided by a bicycle rigged to power an electric generator. Courtesy of CIA hide caption

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Courtesy of CIA

'A Woman Of No Importance' Finally Gets Her Due

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In addition to investigating Russian attacks on the 2016 presidential election, special counsel Robert Mueller also was tasked with looking into "any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The image on the left shows the brains of pigs that were untreated for 10 hours after death, with neurons appearing as green, astrocytes as red and cell nuclei as blue. The image on the right shows cells in the same area of brains that, four hours after death, were hooked up to a system that the Yale University researchers call BrainEx. Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine hide caption

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Stefano G. Daniele and Zvonimir Vrselja, Sestan Laboratory, Yale School of Medicine

Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs

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The out-of-pocket expense of mammograms, MRIs and other tests and treatments can be several thousand dollars each year when you have a high-deductible health policy. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

Assistant Attorney General Brian Benczkowski said Wednesday that if doctors or pharmacists behave like drug dealers, the Justice Department would prosecute them accordingly. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Rod Williams, a Purdue University associate professor, holds a hellbender that he and a team of students collected in southern Indiana's Blue River in 2014. The Eastern hellbender salamander is set to be Pennsylvania's official state amphibian. Rick Callahan/AP hide caption

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Rick Callahan/AP

Heather Martin (left) was a student at Columbine High School in 1999. She met Sherrie Lawson, who worked at the Washington, D.C., Navy Yard in 2013 during the shooting there, through Martin's support organization, the Rebels Project. Nathaniel Minor/CPR hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/CPR

A TV report in South Korea uses file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who supervised the test-firing of a "new-type tactical guided weapon" on Wednesday. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

North Korea Announces Testing Of New 'Tactical Guided Weapon'

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A student leaves Columbine High School late Tuesday in Littleton, Colo. The school was closed Wednesday while authorities looked for a woman they said presented a credible threat ahead of the 20th anniversary of the mass shooting there. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Attorney General William Barr speaks about the release of the redacted version of the Mueller report as U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (right) and U.S. Acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Ed O'Callaghan listen at the Department of Justice Thursday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General William Barr decided on Tuesday that asylum-seekers who clear a "credible fear" interview and are facing removal don't have the right to be released on bond by an immigration court judge while their cases are pending. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

David Vetter, pictured in September 1982 inside part of the bubble environment that was his protective home until he died in 1984. Today most kids born with severe combined immunodeficiency are successfully treated with bone marrow transplants, but researchers think gene therapy is the future. AP hide caption

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AP

Gene Therapy Advances To Better Treat 'Bubble Boy' Disease

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A bowl of creamy cheese grits. Food writer Erin Byers Murray hopes that exploring the story of grits will help spur more discussion about how food shapes our culture, as humble ingredients are elevated into expensive dishes even as we come to terms with long-lost, or ignored, origin stories that deserve recognition. Lauri Patterson/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauri Patterson/Getty Images

A Palestinian man walks near a USAID billboard in the West Bank village of Badhan, north of Nablus, last August. Since January, U.S. financing for humanitarian programs serving Palestinians has been suspended Jaafar Ashtiyeh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jaafar Ashtiyeh/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Aid Agency Is Preparing To Lay Off Most Local Staff For Palestinian Projects

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The International Sweethearts of Rhythm in the 1940s. Courtesy of Rosalind Cron hide caption

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Courtesy of Rosalind Cron

The All-Female Big Bands That Made History During World War II

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CRISPR gene-editing technology allows scientists to make highly precise modifications to DNA. The technology is now starting to be used in human trials to treat several diseases in the U.S. Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway

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