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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

Pittsburgh police investigators gather outside an apartment building on the city's South Side where police say multiple people are dead and others are hospitalized in what they believe to be an isolated drug overdose incident. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

It's estimated that more than half of the indoor cats in the U.S. are overweight. (Above) Miko the cat, aka "Miko Angelo," is seen before and after participation in a study about feline weight loss. Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine hide caption

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Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine

For Fat Cats, The Struggle Is Real When It Comes To Losing Weight And Keeping It Off

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Tyler Flach, 18, is accused of fatally stabbing Khaseen Morris in a brawl stemming from a dispute over a girl. Dozens of students looked on as Morris bled out, even filming the violent scene and posting it to social media. Nassau County Police Department hide caption

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Nassau County Police Department

Amber Guyger, the former Dallas police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man in his own home told a 911 dispatcher, "I thought it was my apartment" several times as she waited for emergency responders to arrive. Guyger is charged in the September, 2018 killing of Botham Jean. Mesquite Police Department via AP hide caption

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Mesquite Police Department via AP

Cokie Roberts, a longtime political reporter and analyst at ABC News and NPR, died on Tuesday. Heidi Gutman/Walt Disney Television via Getty hide caption

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Heidi Gutman/Walt Disney Television via Getty

Stanislav Petrov, a former Soviet military officer, poses at his home in 2015 near Moscow. In 1983, he was on duty when the Soviet Union's early warning satellite indicated the U.S. had fired nuclear weapons at his country. He suspected, correctly, it was a false alarm and did not immediately send the report up the chain of command. Petrov died at age 77. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Earth, Wind & Fire onstage in 1979. Ed Perlstein/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Perlstein/Redferns/Getty Images

The Song That Never Ends: Why Earth, Wind & Fire's 'September' Sustains

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Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, speaks with reporters about a whistleblower complaint on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Democrats Intensify Calls For Potential Impeachment Over Whistleblower Complaint

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Adrian Lamo (center) walks out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., where Chelsea Manning's court-martial was held, on Dec. 20, 2011. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The Mysterious Death Of The Hacker Who Turned In Chelsea Manning

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Brad Pitt stars in Ad Astra as an astronaut in search of his father, who disappeared on a mission many years prior. Francois Duhamel/Twentieth Century Fox hide caption

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Francois Duhamel/Twentieth Century Fox

Brad Pitt On Making 'Ad Astra,' Processing Trauma And Channeling David Bowie

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Cameron and Katlynn Fischer celebrated their April wedding in Colorado. But the day before, Cameron was in such bad shape from a bachelor party hangover that he headed to an emergency room to be rehydrated. That's when their financial headaches began. Courtesy of Cameron Fischer hide caption

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Courtesy of Cameron Fischer

Tawanda Kanhema in 2018 wearing Google Street View camera gear at Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe. Casey Curry hide caption

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Casey Curry

He's Trying To Fill In The Gaps On Google Street View — Starting With Zimbabwe

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Sarah Thomas, a 37-year-old cancer survivor, swims across the 21-mile English Channel. She said she was stung on the face by a jellyfish during her epic swim, in which she crisscrossed the channel four times, a journey that ended up being more than 130 miles because of the tides. Jon Washer/AP hide caption

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Jon Washer/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested a new law is needed to be able to indict a sitting president for potential lawbreaking while in office. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Pelosi Says Congress Should Pass New Laws So Sitting Presidents Can Be Indicted

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Puerto Rican nationalists Irvin Flores Rodriguez, Rafael Cancel Miranda, Lolita Lebron, and Andres Figueroa Cordero, standing in a police lineup following their arrest after a shooting attack on Capitol Hill, March 1, 1954. AP hide caption

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AP

Camille Harris performs choreographed dance moves with a fan at a soul line dancing social event in Washington, D.C. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Soul Line Dancing: Come For The Fitness. Stay For The Friendships

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On the advice of a co-worker, Dehne joined a six-week program through which she learned how to safely walk to ease her pain. Now Dehne briskly walks for exercise and enjoyment multiple times a week. Her knees, she says, "don't hurt me anymore." Eamon Queeney for NPR hide caption

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Eamon Queeney for NPR

Exercising To Ease Pain: Taking Brisk Walks Can Help

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A state police officer stands outside a Woodfield Mall entrance on Friday, in Schaumburg, Ill. An SUV drove into the mall through the Sears entrance and crashed into several stores and kiosks. Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images