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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

The Sept. 29 debate between President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden was widely criticized for its off-the-rails nature and lack of structure. Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images

A heavily redacted supply contract between the federal government and vaccine developer Moderna, headquartered in Cambridge, Mass., was released Friday. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Rush Limbaugh says he intends to keep putting on his radio show despite his stage 4 lung cancer that he says has recently progressed. Here, he's seen reacting as first lady Melania Trump gives him the Presidential Medal of Freedom during the State of the Union address in February. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Marc Short, the chief of staff to Vice President Pence, listens to Pence speak during a White House event in September. Short is the latest White House aide to test positive for the coronavirus. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Country legend Jerry Jeff Walker poses backstage at a country music festival in 2009. Walker, best known for his hit "Mr. Bojangles," died Friday after complications from throat cancer. He was 78. Frazer Harrison/Getty Images hide caption

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Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Senate Democrats speak Oct. 12 after a confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett before the Senate Judiciary Committee. They have announced they will boycott Thursday's scheduled committee vote on Barrett. Stefani Reynolds/Pool via AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Pool via AP

A waiter cleans a table after closing in Saint Germain-en-Laye, west of Paris on Oct. 16, to comply with new COVID-19 restrictions forcing restaurants, cinemas and theaters in the French capital to close. France imposed a nighttime curfew in Paris and other major cities to curb the spread of the coronavirus. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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Michel Euler/AP

Former President Barack Obama campaigns for Democratic nominee Joe Biden in Miami. Obama encouraged people to vote, saying the next 10 days will "matter for decades to come." Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Midshipmen wearing face masks stand and salute before the Navy Midshipmen play against the Houston Cougars on Saturday in Annapolis, Md. Researchers have tried to estimate how many lives would be saved by universal mask-wearing. Patrick Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Smith/Getty Images

In a near-party-line vote Sunday, Senate Republicans advanced President Trump's Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett, seen here on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. A final confirmation vote is set for Monday evening. Sarah Silbiger/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Pool/Getty Images

Medusa cutting her hair and Hercules exercising at home are two examples of Jonathan Muroya's Greek Quarantology illustration series. Jonathan Muroya hide caption

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Jonathan Muroya

The Postal Service says it has already handled 100 million election ballots this year. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

100 Million Ballots, But Experts Say 'Heaven And Earth' Being Moved For Election Mail

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COVID-19 mortality rates are going down, according to studies of two large hospital systems, partly thanks to improvements in treatment. Here, clinicians care for a patient in July at an El Centro, Calif., hospital. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Studies Point To Big Drop In COVID-19 Death Rates

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The latest pandemic dining twist is the outdoor bubble, seen here at a New York City restaurant. Sure, it's a way to stay warm as winter looms ... but does it reduce your risk of getting infected by COVID-19? Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A University of Washington research coordinator holds up a swab after testing a someone for coronavirus on Oct. 23 in Seattle. The U.S. recorded a record high number of new daily cases Friday. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Marissa Tuping, a rural midwife, and Risa Calibuso, right, arrive in Nueva Vizcaya Provincial Hospital on July 21. Calibuso gave birth to her son moments later. Xyza Cruz Bacani For NPR hide caption

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Xyza Cruz Bacani For NPR