NPR.org's Most Popular Stories The most viewed stories on NPR.org in the last 24 hours, updated hourly.

NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced a new set of rules for foreign students in light of the coronavirus pandemic. International students cannot enter or stay in the U.S. if their college offers courses only online in the fall semester. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

NASCAR Cup Series driver Bubba Wallace stands during the national anthem before a NASCAR auto race Sunday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego, pictured March 3 at City Hall in Phoenix, says the city needs more help responding to the coronavirus. Anita Snow/AP hide caption

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Anita Snow/AP

Phoenix Mayor Says The City Is In A 'Crisis Situation,' Needs Help

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Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a military officer at the National Security Council who testified during the impeachment hearings on Capitol Hill, is seen at the White House complex in January. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Senator Waiting For White House Promise Not To Block Promotion Of Impeachment Witness

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Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp slammed Atlanta officials who "have failed to quell ongoing violence" over an especially turbulent few months. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, seen during a ceremony last month in Brasilia, has announced his coronavirus test results. Andressa Anholete/Getty Images hide caption

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Andressa Anholete/Getty Images

Police guard access to housing commission apartments under lockdown in Melbourne, Australia. The hard-hit Australian state of Victoria recorded two deaths and its highest-ever daily increase in coronavirus cases on Monday as authorities prepare to close its border with New South Wales. Andy Brownbill/AP hide caption

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Andy Brownbill/AP

The Manhattan district attorney says he will prosecute Amy Cooper, who called police after a black man asked her to leash her dog in New York's Central Park. Christian Cooper/AP hide caption

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Christian Cooper/AP

A sculpture of Juan de Oñate's settlers arriving in New Mexico is pictured as city workers remove a sculpture of the Spanish conquistador on June 16 in Albuquerque. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

New Mexico Leaders To Militia: If You Want To Help Community, Stop Showing Up Armed

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms condemned weekend violence that included the killing of an 8-year-old girl. "You can't blame this on a police officer," Bottoms said. "You can't say this is about criminal justice reform." Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A statue of the abolitionist and writer Frederick Douglass, pictured here, was torn from its base in Rochester, N.Y., on the anniversary of his famous speech "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" AP hide caption

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AP

The Supreme Court decides that Electoral College delegates have "no ground for reversing" the statewide popular vote. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court Rules State 'Faithless Elector' Laws Constitutional

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Dental offices have begun seeing patients return for routine procedures. Seattle dentist Kathleen Saturay has increased the layers of protective equipment she wears when treating patients. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

James Henley Thornwell regularly defended slavery and promoted white supremacy from his pulpit at the First Presbyterian Church in Columbia, S.C. A.H. Ritchie/The Collected Writings of James Henley Thornwell, 1871 hide caption

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A.H. Ritchie/The Collected Writings of James Henley Thornwell, 1871

White Supremacist Ideas Have Historical Roots In U.S. Christianity

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The Boston salon where Vincent Cox works has reopened, and the 65-year-old is back at work. "It's been one of the hardest things I've ever done in my life," he says. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

'Almost In Tears': A Hairstylist Worries About Reopening Too Soon

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