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NPR.org's Most Popular Stories

In the last 24 hours, updated hourly

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California displays the signed article of impeachment against President Trump in an engrossment ceremony before transmission to the Senate for trial on Capitol Hill. It's unclear when a Senate trial will start. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President-elect Joe Biden at the Delaware Humane Society on Nov. 17, 2018, the day he officially adopted his dog, Major. Stephanie Gomez Carter/Delaware Humane Association hide caption

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Stephanie Gomez Carter/Delaware Humane Association

Biden's German Shepherd To Be Celebrated With 'Indoguration' Hosted By Animal Shelter

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Staff and residents of the Ararat Nursing Facility in the Mission Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles got COVID-19 shots on Jan. 7. Coronavirus cases, hospitalizations and deaths have been surging throughout Los Angeles County. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

When law enforcement officials failed to anticipate that pro-Trump supporters would devolve into a violent mob, they fell victim to what one expert calls "the invisible obvious." He said it was hard for authorities to see that people who looked like them could want to commit this kind of violence. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Why Didn't The FBI And DHS Produce A Threat Report Ahead of The Capitol Insurrection?

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A screenshot from the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection allegedly shows gold medalist swimmer Klete Keller wearing an Olympic jacket. U.S. District Court hide caption

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U.S. District Court

President-elect Joe Biden plans to name a slate of career officials as acting heads of agencies until the Senate confirms his picks. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Supporters of President Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio says investigators are looking at "potentially members of Congress" who gave tours to rioters prior to the insurrection. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Audience members react as President Trump delivers remarks in January 2020 at an Evangelicals for Trump coalition launch at the King Jesus International Ministry in Miami. Tom Brenner/Reuters hide caption

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Tom Brenner/Reuters

'How Did We Get Here?' A Call For An Evangelical Reckoning On Trump

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said on Wednesday that he believes tech companies that banned President Trump from various social media platforms was a move that sets a dangerous precedent for a free Internet. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

FAA administrator Stephen Dickson, seen testifying before a Senate committee last year, has ordered "zero tolerance" of passengers who disrupt airline flights. Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Robert Packer of Newport News, Va., appears Wednesday in a mug shot following his arrest on federal charges related to the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Western Tidewater Regional Jail/AP hide caption

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Western Tidewater Regional Jail/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said that impeaching President Trump is "a constitutional remedy that will ensure that the republic will be safe from this man." She's seen here walking to the House floor Wednesday ahead of the vote. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

A coronavirus variant that is thought to be more contagious was detected in the United States in Elbert County, Colo., not far from this testing site in Parker, Colo. The variant has been detected in several U.S. states. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Fox Business host Lou Dobbs suggested Republicans who voted to certify President-elect Joe Biden's win were "criminal." John Lamparski/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/Getty Images

After Deadly Capitol Riot, Fox News Stays Silent On Stars' Incendiary Rhetoric

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Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as they try to storm the Capitol in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. Demonstrators breached security and entered the Capitol as Congress debated the 2020 electoral vote certification. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Patches is reunited with Norm Borgatello, her late owner's partner, at the Animal Shelter Assistance Program in Santa Barbara County, Calif., on Dec. 31. Jillian Title/Animal Shelter Assistance Program via AP hide caption

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Jillian Title/Animal Shelter Assistance Program via AP

The Cat Who Came Back: Patches, Believed Killed In Mudslide, Shows Up 3 Years Later

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