The March On Washington At 50 NPR coverage of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, one of the hallmark events of the American civil rights movement.
Special Series

The March On Washington At 50

NPR coverage of the March on Washington, one of the hallmark events of the civil rights movement.

A white heckler arrested during an anti-segregation demonstration in Lexington, Ky., is hustled into a police car in August 1963. Forty years later, the Lexington Herald-Leader ran a correction apologizing for the newspaper's lack of coverage of the civil rights movement. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

A spectator on the National Mall holds an image of President Obama and Martin Luther King during the 2013 presidential inauguration in January. Gabriel B. Tait/MCT/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Gabriel B. Tait/MCT/Landov

Clarence B. Jones, legal adviser to Martin Luther King Jr., takes notes behind King at a press conference regarding in Birmingham, Ala., in February 1963. Ernst Haas/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ernst Haas/Getty Images

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., speaks Saturday at the Lincoln Memorial during activities to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. Michael Reynolds/EPA /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Reynolds/EPA /Landov

Clarence B. Jones this month in Palo Alto, Calif. As Martin Luther King Jr.'s attorney and adviser, Jones contributed to many of King's speeches, including his famous speech at the March on Washington in 1963. Norbert von der Groeben/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Norbert von der Groeben/Reuters/Landov

George Whitmore Jr., a 19-year-old unemployed laborer, is shown in a Brooklyn, N.Y., police station on April 25, 1964, after his arrest in the Career Girl Murders. Jack Kanthal/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jack Kanthal/AP

Joseph Burden (third row, third from right) with his graduating class at Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department training academy in 1960. Every officer on the force was required to work the day of the March on Washington. Courtesy of Joseph Burden hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Joseph Burden

Gerald Bundy of Philadelphia was 13 when his older cousin convinced him to go to the March on Washington in 1963. Bundy returned 50 years later to celebrate the anniversary. When he looks back on it now he believes the experience, "made me more cognizant of social justice; made me an activist." Chloe Coleman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Chloe Coleman/NPR

Demonstrators on Saturday in Washington, D.C., commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer of Ruleville, Miss., speaks to the state's Freedom Democratic Party sympathizers outside the Capitol in Washington, D.C., in 1965. William J. Smith/AP hide caption

toggle caption
William J. Smith/AP

Activist Bayard Rustin points to a map during a press conference four days ahead of the March on Washington in August 1963. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Robert Avery has been a councilman in his hometown of Gadsden, Ala., for almost three decades. As a teen, he and two friends hitchhiked to the nation's capital, where they made signs for the March on Washington. Erica Yoon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Erica Yoon/NPR

A newspaper clipping from The Cincinnati Herald on Sept. 14, 1963, included a picture of Jack Hansan and other members of the Cincinnati delegation. Courtesy of Jack Hansan hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jack Hansan