The U.S. Response To Syria The White House says there is "compelling" evidence that Syrian President Bashar Assad's regime used chemical weapons against its own people on Aug. 21, 2013, killing 1,429 people. Having called chemical weapons use a "red line," the U.S. is considering a military strike.
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The U.S. Response To Syria

The Syrian regime calls a new deal on its chemical weapons a victory, in a reaction that came one day after the U.S. and Russia announced the plan. On Saturday, live coverage of the the deal drew the attention of a Damascus flower shop owner. Anwar Amro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anwar Amro/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama's speeches about Syria have at times seemed to reveal his own internal struggle on the topic. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A Free Syrian Army fighter looks through the scope of his sniper rifle at an area controlled by forces loyal to President Bashar Assad in Aleppo. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

Russia's President Vladimir Putin welcomes President Obama at the start of the G-20 summit on Sept. 5 in St. Petersburg. Russia. Eric Feferburg/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Feferburg/AFP/Getty Images

Vice President Joe Biden, projected on screens, gestures as he addresses the American-Israeli Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) 2013 Policy Conference in March. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin penned an op-ed in The New York Times to counter President Obama's arguments about possible military strikes against Syria. Klimentyev Mikhail/ITAR-TASS /Landov hide caption

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Klimentyev Mikhail/ITAR-TASS /Landov

President Obama walks along the West Wing Colonnade toward the Oval Office ahead of Tuesday night's speech on Syria. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Obama addresses the nation in a live televised speech from the East Room of the White House on Tuesday. Evan Vucci/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Evan Vucci/Pool/Getty Images

In Washington, D.C., this week, there have been demonstrations both in favor of and against a military strike on targets in Syria. Outside the White House on Monday, supporters of Syrian President Bashar Assad waved a Syrian flag with his face on it. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Farmers ride in their tractor in the drought-hit region of Hasaka in northeastern Syria on June 17, 2010. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

The Greek Orthodox monastery of Mar Takla in the Syrian Christian town of Maaloula is seen on Sept. 7. The town is now controlled by a rebel group with al-Qaida ties. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Benjamin Ferencz speaks at the inauguration of the "Memorial Nuremberg Trials" information and documentation center in Nuremberg, Germany, on Nov. 21, 2010. After World War II, Ferencz served as a chief prosecutor in the Nuremberg trials of Nazi war criminals. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama holds a press conference in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Friday on the sideline of the G-20 summit. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama on Friday at the G-20 Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters/Landov

From 'Morning Edition': White House adviser Tony Blinken talks with NPR's Steve Inskeep

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Syrian rebel fighters run run for cover during clashes Wednesday with government forces in Aleppo. Syria's largest city has been bitterly divided since heavy fighting broke out more than a year ago. The government army controls the western part of the city; the rebels control the east. Residents risk sniper fire as they cross back and forth. Aleppo Media Center/AP hide caption

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Aleppo Media Center/AP