Code Switch: Word Watch Each week, we take a look at a word or phrase that's caught our attention, whether for its history, usage, etymology, or just because it has an interesting story. This week, we look into how we came to call cannabis "marijuana," and the role Mexico played in that shift.
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Code Switch: Word Watch

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke (third from left) speaks as Sens. Cory Booker, Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar look on during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate, Wednesday in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Primary Season Is Here And 'Hispandering' Is Back

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Cry me a river, because I cried a river over you. Martin Leigh/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Leigh/Getty Images

When The 'White Tears' Just Keep Coming

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In a country where the share of multiracial children has multiplied tenfold in the past 50 years, it's a good time to take stock of our shared vocabulary when it comes to describing Americans like me. Jeannie Phan for NPR hide caption

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Jeannie Phan for NPR

Signs marking the entrance to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota make it clear when you're literally "off the reservation," but the figurative meaning of the phrase has shifted over time. Kristi Eaton/AP hide caption

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Kristi Eaton/AP