U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work Commuting to jobs is unavoidable, often undesirable and in some cases, getting longer. Nationwide, initiatives are helping to make commutes better. NPR explores some of these efforts and invites listeners to join the conversation using #NPRcommute.
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U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work

NPR explores efforts to solve commuting challenges nationwide.

Original caption via Instagram: #pscommute 5:15 PM on the C Train. 34th Street, Penn Station back home to Fort Greene, Brooklyn. Giving the gift of reading. A magical moment between mother and son. It may seem like just another subway ride, but with a book and an imagination, the adventures are limitless. Jabali Sawicki/@jsawicki1/Instagram hide caption

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Jabali Sawicki/@jsawicki1/Instagram

With One Photo, The Average Commute Becomes Super Special

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It takes Chicago resident Sarah Hairston two hours to go 15 miles to get to her part-time job. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

Study: Commuting Adversely Affects Political Engagement

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Neville Amaria's commute to work used to take up to 1.5 hours each way. He carpooled with colleagues including Stefanie McNally, Cristina Cooper and Bryan Kim. The gang passed the time by sleeping and snapping photos of unlucky commuters. Courtesy of Cristina Cooper hide caption

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Courtesy of Cristina Cooper

There were 1.5 million boardings on the Emery Go Round last year. Zikhona Tetana, a visiting scientist from South Africa, is taking the Emery Go Round to a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory facility in Emeryville. "It's convenient and always on time," she says. Cindy Carpien/NPR hide caption

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Cindy Carpien/NPR

Stephen Linaweaver has been kayaking from Oakland, Calif., to work in San Francisco for four years. Courtesy of Dan Suyeyasu hide caption

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Courtesy of Dan Suyeyasu

Construction of the Atlanta streetcar line has hurt many businesses along the route, but there is hope that economic gains will increase once the line opens next spring. Kathy Lohr/NPR hide caption

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Kathy Lohr/NPR

Orangutans can get exercise and look down their noses at zoo visitors, thanks to cables that stretch from one side of the primate habitat to the other. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Reverse commuters, include Kathy LeVeque (in the foreground), wait for an approaching outbound Metra commuter train at the Mayfair neighborhood stop on Chicago's northwest side. David Schaper/NPR hide caption

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David Schaper/NPR

Commuters headed to Oregon Health and Science University use cars, bikes and streetcars to connect with Portland's aerial tram, which whisks them up and over south waterfront neighborhoods. David P. Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David P. Gilkey/NPR

How To Solve A Sky-High Commuting Conundrum

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Becca Bullard commutes every day from Arlington, Va., via Metro's Virginia Square station to her work in downtown Washington, D.C. Her commute to work begins around 9 a.m. (left), and she arrives home around 6:30 p.m. (right). Courtesy of Becca Bullard hide caption

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Courtesy of Becca Bullard

How One D.C. Suburb Set A Gold Standard For Commuting

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