20 Years Of NAFTA The North American Free Trade Agreement went into effect Jan. 1, 1994. Critics of the much-debated agreement had predicted it would result in massive job losses in the U.S., but analysts say NAFTA has had a mixed impact on the economy.
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20 Years Of NAFTA

Critics of the trade pact said it would hurt U.S. jobs, but analysts say it has had a mixed impact.

Obama's Position On Free Trade Marks Subtle Evolution

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Wave Of Illegal Immigrants Gains Speed After NAFTA

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The Secret Protectionism Buried Inside NAFTA

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An auto worker tightens bolts on a Focus at a Ford plant in Michigan in October. Labor unions predicted in 1993 that NAFTA would send many U.S. manufacturing jobs to Mexico, and they continue to argue that the pact prompted a race to the bottom for workers. Mira Oberman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mira Oberman/AFP/Getty Images

Freshly caught catfish wriggle in large nets in Doddsville, Miss. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

How NAFTA Drove The Auto Industry South

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A truck bearing Mexican and U.S. flags approaches the border crossing into the U.S., in Laredo, Texas. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Reuters /Landov

Kayakers head out on the Rio Grande toward one of the international bridges that connect Laredo, Texas, and the town of Nuevo Laredo in Mexico. Raw sewage and animal carcasses float in the water. Neena Satija/Texas Tribune hide caption

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Neena Satija/Texas Tribune