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Corn from a fall harvest in Guatemala. John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images hide caption

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John Seaton Callahan/Getty Images

In Guatemala, A Bad Year For Corn — And For U.S. Aid

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Novel Centers On When The Heart Stops Beating But The Brain Remains Active

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Renia Spiegel (left) and her younger sister, now known as Elizabeth Bellak, wade in the Dniester River around 1935. The photo can be seen on the cover of the published edition of Renia's Diary. Courtesy of Elizabeth Bellak/St. Martin's Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Elizabeth Bellak/St. Martin's Press

Renia Spiegel's Diary Survived The Holocaust. People Are Finally Reading It

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A 'Fiddler On The Roof' Match Made

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Tracy Chevalier says she learned the needlepoint stitches used by the women in A Single Thread while researching the book. Nina Subin hide caption

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Nina Subin

Tracy Chevalier Says 'A Single Thread' Can Make All The Difference

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"You are not so different," squawked Seagull, who flew overhead. "You both cast long shadows." Michaela Goade/Little, Brown Books for Young Readers hide caption

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Michaela Goade/Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

A Sailor Meets A Fisherman In 1534: It's An 'Encounter,' Not A Discovery

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Jeannie Gaffigan On Surviving A Brain Tumor In 'When Life Gives You Pears'

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Petra Mayer/NPR

In 'Imaginary Friend,' Stephen Chbosky Squeezes Horror From Everyday Life

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Director Steven Soderbergh Takes A Look At Money Laundering In 'The Laundromat'

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The Days Of American Culture Dominance Are Over, Author Says

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Triathletes who trained too much chose immediate gratification over long-term rewards, researchers found. Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Markus Büsges/EyeEm/Getty Images

Too Much Training Can Tax Athletes' Brains

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Why Are Syrian War Crimes Being Prosecuted In Germany?

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Youth in a pill by 2050? NPR hide caption

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NPR

VIDEO: What If Aging Wasn't Inevitable? The Quest To Slow And Even Reverse Aging

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An employee of the Boston biotech company Ginkgo Bioworks runs a gene sequencing machine through its paces. The company synthesizes thousands of genes a month, which are then inserted into cells that become mini factories of useful products. Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks hide caption

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Tim Llewellyn/Copperhound Pictures/Ginkgo Bioworks

As Made-To-Order DNA Gets Cheaper, Keeping It Out Of The Wrong Hands Gets Harder

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Stefan Krasowski, co-founder of the Reach For The Miles meetup, stands in front of Krak des Chevaliers in western Syria. The war-torn country was the last one that Krasowski, who has since turned 40, had yet to visit. Stefan Krasowski/Rapid Travel Chai hide caption

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Stefan Krasowski/Rapid Travel Chai

How One Man Used Miles To Fulfill His Dream To Visit Every Country Before Turning 40

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