War On Poverty, 50 Years Later Fifty years after President Johnson launched the "war on poverty," NPR checks in on what it means to be poor today. As the debate over "income inequality" continues, this year-long series looks at what's working, what's not and what new ideas are on the horizon to fight poverty.
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War On Poverty, 50 Years Later

President Lyndon B. Johnson and his wife, Lady Bird, greet Tom Fletcher's family in Inez, Ky., in 1964. Fletcher was an unemployed saw mill worker with eight children. Bettman/Corbis hide caption

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Colby Kirk of Inez, Ky., is a junior at the University of Kentucky, studying to be a financial analyst. He says there aren't many opportunities for college grads in his hometown. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Coal-Mining Area Grapples With How To Keep 'Bright Young Minds'

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President Lyndon Johnson, on the porch of Tom Fletcher's cabin, listens to Fletcher describe some of the problems in Martin County, Ky., in 1964. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Kentucky County That Gave War On Poverty A Face Still Struggles

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