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Students Patrick Rohrer, Sarah Warthen, Alix Piven and Lauren Urane are led by Mercyhurst University Archeologist Andy Hemmings. Their project has picked up where Florida's State Geologist Elias Sellards left off in 1915. Sellards led an excavation of the site where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized human remains. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

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Student volunteers with The Campus Kitchens Project evaluate produce. The initiative gets high-school and college students to scavenge food from cafeterias, grocery stores and farmers' markets, cook it and deliver it to organizations serving low-income people in their communities. Courtesy of DC Central Kitchen hide caption

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Courtesy of DC Central Kitchen

Fernandina's Flicker (Colaptes fernandinae), a woodpecker found only in Cuba. Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis hide caption

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Pete Oxford/Minden Pictures/Corbis

U.S. Biologists Keen To Explore, Help Protect Cuba's Wild Places

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Deputy Chief Mark Saunders speaks at a news conference in Toronto on Tuesday. A mysterious tunnel discovered in Toronto near one of the venues for this summer's Pan American Games contained a rosary with a crucifix and poppy. Police said there is nothing to suggest the tunnel was linked to criminal activity. Aaron Harris/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Aaron Harris/Reuters/Landov

Citing violence and a refugee crisis in Syria and elsewhere, Amnesty International says international groups haven't done enough to help. Earlier this month, an injured Syrian girl was treated at a makeshift clinic, after government air strikes on a rebel-held area northeast of Damascus. Abd Doumany/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Abd Doumany/AFP/Getty Images

Ukrainian servicemen stand guard on a street near a burning building after a shelling by pro-Russian rebels of a residential sector in Mariupol, eastern Ukraine, last month. Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Reuters /Landov

With the technology to conduct more nuanced tests, some companies say they can provide more useful detail about how people think in dynamic situations. Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Recruiting Better Talent With Brain Games And Big Data

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A worker at Soulis Furs in Kastoria sorts through treated mink pelts. "We buy the pelts — minks or foxes or other animals — from North America and Scandinavia and send them for treatment in factories or abroad," says Makis Gioras of Soulis Furs in Kastoria. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

A Greek City Nervously Watches Its Fur Trade Falter

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Former Virginia first lady Maureen McDonnell (left) arrives at federal court in Richmond, Va., with her son Bobby for her sentencing on corruption charges Friday. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

There's a second chance coming for some people who didn't buy health insurance and would face a big tax penalty for 2015 otherwise. Laughing Stock/Corbis hide caption

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Laughing Stock/Corbis

One form of carbapenem-resistant bacteria seen in culture. CRE bacteria are blamed for 600 deaths a year in the U.S. and can withstand treatment by virtually every kind of antibiotic. CDC hide caption

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CDC