Google News Editor's Picks Editor's Picks for Google News

Google News Editor's Picks

About twice a year, statistics suggest, a pilot somewhere in the world — usually flying alone — deliberately crashes a plane. The Germanwing flight downed last week may be one such case. But most people who fit the psychological profile of the pilots in these very rare events never have problems while flying. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

No Easy, Reliable Way To Screen For Suicide

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/396399647/396505356" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At Resource Management's materials recovery facility, workers pull plastic bags, other trash and large pieces of cardboard off the conveyor belts before the mixed single-stream recyclables enter the sorting machines. Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio

With 'Single-Stream' Recycling, Convenience Comes At A Cost

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/396319000/396505374" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Not many students have the cutting-edge cybersecurity skills the NSA needs, recruiters say. And these days industry is paying top dollar for talent. Brooks Kraft/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Brooks Kraft/Corbis

After Snowden, The NSA Faces Recruitment Challenge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395829446/396505324" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sandra Calligaro for NPR

The Ascent Of Afghan Women

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/393900537/396505330" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

There's a widely held assumption that a slight imbalance in male births has its start at the very moment of conception. But researchers say factors later in pregnancy are more likely to explain the phenomenon. CNRI/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
CNRI/Science Source

Why Are More Baby Boys Born Than Girls?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/396384911/396505344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Detective Mark Williams (right) speaks with an officer in Richmond, Va. A decade ago, amid a surge in violent crime, Richmond police were identifying relatively few murder suspects. So the police department refocused its efforts to bring up its "clearance rate." Alex Matzke for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Matzke for NPR

Open Cases: Why One-Third Of Murders In America Go Unresolved

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395069137/396280364" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Frances Stevens uses a custom ramp leading to her van. An accident at work in 1997 left her unable to walk. She received full workers' compensation benefits until two years ago, when the insurer withdrew her medications and home health aide. Her lawsuit is a test of California's use of anonymous, independent medical reviewers. Glenna Gordon for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Glenna Gordon for ProPublica

Employers And Insurers Gain Control In Workers' Compensation Disputes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395765942/396280394" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cushing, Okla., is a major oil storage site. Amid record oil production, some analysts worry the U.S. will run out of places to put it all. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

With So Much Oil Flowing, U.S. May Be Reaching Storage Limits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395776212/396280382" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NPR senior Washington editor Beth Donovan walks on a treadmill desk in her office in Washington, D.C. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Sure, Use A Treadmill Desk — But You Still Need To Exercise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/392580747/396280376" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A German police investigator carries a box after searching an apartment believed to belong to the crashed Germanwings flight 4U 9524 co-pilot Andreas Lubitz in Duesseldorf, on Thursday. Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters/Landov

Needle exchange programs, like this one in Portland, Maine, offer free, sterile syringes and needles to drug users. The programs save money and lives, health officials say, by curtailing the spread of bloodborne infections, such as hepatitis and HIV. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Indiana's HIV Spike Prompts New Calls For Needle Exchanges Statewide

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395821345/395966164" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Robert Duncan poses with his wife, Karen, for New York photographer Iké Udé. Iké Udé/Courtesy of Robert and Karen Duncan hide caption

toggle caption
Iké Udé/Courtesy of Robert and Karen Duncan

Nigerian Artist Continues A Family Tradition With 'Sartorial Anarchy'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/389316816/395966291" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police officers carry boxes outside a house in Montabaur, Germany, on Thursday in connection with the investigation into the Germanwings A320 crash. Fredrik von Erichsen /EPA /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Fredrik von Erichsen /EPA /Landov

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly is seen inside a Soyuz simulator at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center on March 4 in Star City, Russia. Kelly, along with Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency, are scheduled for launch Friday aboard a Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. NASA/Bill Ingalls hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/Bill Ingalls

NASA To Study A Twin In Space And His Brother On Earth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/395536140/395698534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript