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Members of Nepal's Armed Police Force carry an officer as they cheer the successful rescue of a teenager who had been trapped by Saturday's earthquake in Kathmandu. Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters /Landov

Brig. Gen. Viet Luong of the 1st Cavalry Division came to the United States in the 1970s after his family fled Vietnam in the waning days of the war there. He's now leading the effort to train Afghan soldiers to fight the Taliban. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

The Frightened Vietnamese Kid Who Became A U.S. Army General

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Archbishop Michael Fitzgerald is one of the Catholic Church's top experts on Islam. He has served the Vatican in places such as Tunisia, Uganda and Egypt, and now is promoting interfaith understanding by teaching Jesuit students in Cleveland about the Quran. /Rob Wetzler hide caption

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/Rob Wetzler

Learning About The Quran ... From A Catholic Archbishop

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Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks at a rally demanding presidential action to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Sanders will run to Hillary Clinton's left, trying to elevate economic issues. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Seeking Presidency, 'Socialist' Sanders Looks To Elevate Less-Talked About Issues

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A young girl sits on her luggage as she waits in a long line with her family, hoping to board buses provided by the government to return to their homes outside Kathmandu. Diego Azubel/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Diego Azubel/EPA /LANDOV

In Nepal, A Flood Of People Leave Capital To Return Home

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A man makes a heart shape with his hands during a peaceful protest near the CVS pharmacy that was set on fire on Monday in Baltimore. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Baltimore Is Not Ferguson. Here's What It Really Is

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Bottles of the sedative midazolam at a hospital pharmacy in Oklahoma City. AP hide caption

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AP

After Botched Executions, Supreme Court Weighs Lethal Drug Cocktail

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President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe approach the podiums for a joint press conference Tuesday at the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. President Obama is hoping to finalize a new trade agreement with Japan and other Asian nations soon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Obama Confident In Asia Trade Pact, But Track Record For Deals Is Spotty

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An artillery gun fires a round at Taliban fighters in the hills of Nangahar Province. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

On Its Own, The Afghan Army Takes The Fight To The Taliban

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Boston on Monday. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

The Past Haunts The Present For Japan's Shinzo Abe

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Protesters hold a pro-gay-rights flag outside the US Supreme Court on Saturday, countering the demonstrators who attended the March For Marriage in Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court meets on Tuesday to hear arguments over whether same-sex couples have a constitutional right to wed in the United States, with a final decision expected in June. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Legal Battle Over Gay Marriage Hits The Supreme Court Tuesday

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