Back At Base NPR — along with six public radio stations around the country — is chronicling the lives of America's troops, where they live.
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Special Series

Back At Base

NPR, KAZU, KPBS, KSKA, WBUR, WPLN AND WUNC chronicle lives of U.S. troops, where they live.

U.S. soldiers with actors portraying Afghan officials as part of their training to be advisers. Jay Price/WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price/WUNC

Soldiers, With Empathy: U.S. Army Creates Dedicated Adviser Brigades

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Sgt. Nick Cunningham speeds down the track during men's bobsled training on Friday. He is one of seven U.S. service members competing in Pyeongchang. "They told me, 'Go win medals for this country,'" Cunningham says. "And that's my job at this moment." Quinn Rooney/Getty Images hide caption

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Quinn Rooney/Getty Images

Secret Ops of the CIA and Secret Aviation Ops of the CIA wall calendars contain paintings depicting declassified spy missions from the agency's past. The original paintings are displayed at CIA headquarters in Virginia. Jay Price/North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price/North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

CIA Calendar Art Offers A Glimpse Into The World Of Spies

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Re-Creating The Berlin Airlift's Candy Drop In North Carolina

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Participants in a "Rolling Thunder" POW/MIA ceremony are reflected in a Vietnam War memorial at Lejeune Memorial Gardens in Jacksonville, N.C. Jay Price/North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price/North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

Having Changed America, The League Of POW/MIA Families Fades

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Soldiers practice roll-over drills ahead of their deployment to Afghanistan at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

16 Years Since The First Deployment, U.S. Soldiers Prepare To Go Again

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Army Spc. Kevin Bogucki, left, of the 82nd Airborne Division prepares for a training jump last month at Fort Bragg, N.C. Matt Couch/WUNC hide caption

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Matt Couch/WUNC

82nd Airborne Division Celebrates 100 Years

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Fighter jets from Otis Air Force Base in Cape Cod, Mass. were quickly launched in response to the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks. State officials fought to keep the base open in 2005 and mostly succeeded, though the fighter wing shifted to cyber intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Lisa Poole/AP hide caption

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Lisa Poole/AP

Monterey: Listen to the Story

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Christian Wade of the 2nd Marine Division at Camp Lejeune shoots a suppressed carbine. The suppressor, which is the canister on the end of the barrel, turn a painful, deafening noise into simply a loud one. Timothy Lutz and Clarence Wimberly/Courtesy U.S. Marine Corps hide caption

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Timothy Lutz and Clarence Wimberly/Courtesy U.S. Marine Corps

Military Tries To Cut Through The Noise Of War

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Widowed while pregnant with their second son, Gloria Grijalva shares pictures of her husband, U.S. Army veteran Charlie Grijalva, who committed suicide in December 2014. KPBS hide caption

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KPBS

VA Hospitals Still Struggling With Adding Staff Despite Billions From Choice Act

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Jeff Lynch (left) and his wife, Christy, sought fertility treatments after Jeff returned home from his two deployments to Iraq, which left him unable to have children naturally. Brian Batista/American Homefront hide caption

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Brian Batista/American Homefront

New Law Provides Fertility Treatment Benefits To Wounded Veterans

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Sgt. Nathaniel Rivet will deploy for his third time after a visit home for the holidays. Jay Price/WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price/WUNC

In Preparation For The Holidays, Some Troops Start Packing For Deployment

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Inside the Ord Community Commissary in California's Monterey Bay area. The commissary sets prices at just over cost, so that commissaries around the world maintain consistent pricing no matter where troops are stationed. Krista Almanzan/KAZU hide caption

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Krista Almanzan/KAZU

With More Big-Box Stores In Reach, Are Commissaries Still Needed?

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Lt. Col. Alan Brown stands in his garage, filled with boxes that will be sent to the family's new home in New York. In the background is Lucy, the family's Schnauzer. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

As Military Moving Costs Rise, It's Difficult For Officials To Keep Track

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Psychologist Diane Adams devotes a portion of her private practice in Renton, Wash., to veterans. But she said the bureaucracy involved in the Veterans Choice program has proved frustrating and veterans have had a hard time getting approval to see her. Patricia Murphy/KUOW hide caption

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Patricia Murphy/KUOW

For Doctors And Patients, 'Veterans Choice' Often Means Long Waits

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Navy veteran Amanda Wirtz looks through her correspondence with the Veterans Choice program. After the VA couldn't get her an appointment with a specialist, it sent her to the Choice program. But she still was unable to get an appointment for several months. Courtesy of KPBS hide caption

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Courtesy of KPBS

How Congress And The VA Left Many Veterans Without A 'Choice'

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"Some days I wake up and go, 'Am I wasting time, when I could be on chemotherapy or getting a surgery?' " asks Tony Lapinski, a Montana veteran who worries about what is causing his severe back pain. Michael Albans for NPR hide caption

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Michael Albans for NPR

Despite $10B 'Fix,' Veterans Are Waiting Even Longer To See Doctors

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Steve and Janet Singleton, both Navy veterans, have lived in Clarksville, Tenn., for about a year. Steve couldn't get into the local VA clinic last spring, so now they have to drive to the Nashville clinic or pay out of pocket for medical care. Emily Siner/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Emily Siner/Nashville Public Radio

Overcrowding Forces Tennessee VA Clinic To Stop Accepting New Patients

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David Cline places the portrait of his uncle Sgt. Robert Dakin into a box with other memorabilia. Dakin was declared missing 65 years ago in Korea. It wasn't until recently that his remains were identified, and this past December, they were returned to his family. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Remains Of Korean War Soldier Reunite A Family

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Irvin Bishop Small at his home in York, Pa. Quil Lawrence/NPR hide caption

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Quil Lawrence/NPR

For The VA's Broken Health System, The Fix Needs A Fix

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Hull stands in a room of his home decorated with photos of movie star John Wayne. "He was the only hero we had growing up. No one beats the Duke. You never heard about the Duke giving up," Hull says. Gordon King for NPR hide caption

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Gordon King for NPR

After Overpayment Of Benefits, VA Wanted $38,000 Back

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