Hidden Brain The Hidden Brain helps curious people understand the world – and themselves. Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain's host Shankar Vedantam reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships.

Hidden BrainHidden Brain

A conversation about life's unseen patterns
Nick Shepherd/Getty Images/Ikon Images
Fanatic Studio/Gary Waters/SCIEN/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra
Sean Gladwell/Getty Images

Actors reading during the recording of an episode of the radio soap opera "Musekeweya" in Kigali, produced by the NGO Radio La Benevolencija. Twice a week, people all around Rwanda gather in groups to listen together. Stephanie Aglietti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stephanie Aglietti/AFP/Getty Images

At seventeen years old, Fred Clay was sentenced to prison for a crime he did not commit. Various flawed ideas in psychology were used to determine his guilt. Ken Richardson/Ken Richardson hide caption

toggle caption
Ken Richardson/Ken Richardson

Thomas Jefferson owned hundreds of slaves, yet he also wrote that "all men are created equal." How did he square the contradictions between his values and his everyday life? ericfoltz/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ericfoltz/Getty Images

Economist Amir Sufi says debt plays a bigger role in recessions than we typically recognize. erhui1979/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
erhui1979/Getty Images
Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images

The Mind Of The Village: Understanding Our Implicit Biases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/880379282/880467634" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Olutosin Oduwole at his home in New Jersey in 2016. Shankar Vedantam /NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shankar Vedantam /NPR
Santiago Mejia/The San Francisco Chronicle/Getty Images

Graduating High School During A Recession Could Be A Good Thing, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/879041045/879041046" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hannah Groch-Begley listens to Dylan Matthews play the ukulele at their home in Washington, D.C. Dylan had hesitated to buy the ukulele because it felt like too big of an indulgence. Shankar Vedantam/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shankar Vedantam/NPR
DNY59/Getty Images
Images by Fabio/Getty Images

A recent study found that black doctors were more effective than non-black doctors at convincing black men to use preventative health services. Angela Hsieh hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Hsieh

Bilal Chaudhry, 16, picks up a dozen eggs to give to a person in a car during a free egg distribution in Cumru Township, PA. The distribution was held to help people during the COVID-19 outbreak. MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Theory Vs. Reality: Why Our Economic Behavior Isn't Always Rational

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/864335677/864547892" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The belief that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr hide caption

toggle caption
Renee Klahr

Volunteers for the grassroots network Columbia Community Care organize donated groceries and household items at one of five distribution sites in Howard County, Maryland. Courtesy of Erika Strauss Chavarria hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Erika Strauss Chavarria

Anderson High School senior Teyaja Jones, right, poses in her cap and gown and a bandana face cover, Tuesday, May 5, 2020, in Austin, Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP
Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/848404620/848861960" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">