Hidden Brain The Hidden Brain helps curious people understand the world – and themselves. Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain's host Shankar Vedantam reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships.

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A conversation about life's unseen patterns
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Finding Meaning At Work: How We Shape And Think About Our Jobs

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A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado.John Moore/Getty Images John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible, but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Radio Replay: Life, Interrupted

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Every time you give in to your phone or computer that's buzzing with notifications, you pay a price: little by little, you lose your ability to focus. Veronica Grech/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Scarcity can make it difficult for us to focus on anything other than the problem right in front of us. Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Creative Differences: The Benefits Of Reaching Out To People Unlike Ourselves

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Stacya Shepard thought she knew her dad. But that changed one day with a phone call from a stranger. Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr /Photo courtesy of Stacya Shepard Silverman hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Renee Klahr /Photo courtesy of Stacya Shepard Silverman

Researchers say there's growing evidence that nature has a powerful effect on us, improving both our physical and psychological health. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible — but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist, and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Decisions, Decisions: Some We Struggle To Make, Others We Can't Forget

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The belief that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

The only surviving photo of Vivian Buck, here with her adoptive mother in 1924. This is the moment Vivian is determined by a eugenics researcher to be "feeble-minded" for not looking at a coin held in front of her face. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY hide caption

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M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY

Whose Utopia? How Science Used The Bodies Of People Deemed 'Less Than'

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Our voices convey so much more than just information. They can tell other people something essential about who we are. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh
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The Best Medicine: Decoding The Hidden Meanings Of Laughter

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Psychologist Phil Tetlock thinks the parable of the fox and the hedgehog represents two different cognitive styles. "The hedgehogs are more the big idea people, more decisive," while the foxes are more accepting of nuance, more open to using different approaches with different problems. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr
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How Private Prisons Affect Sentencing

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