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NPR Stories For Apple News

The former Pope Benedict XVI, seen here in 2010, did not intervene in four cases of sexual abuse when he was the archbishop of Munich and Freising, according to a law firm's new report. The inquiry was commissioned by the archdiocese. Andreas Solaro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Solaro/AFP via Getty Images

A car drives past the U.S. Embassy in Havana in 2019. Americans working at the embassy began reporting unexplained illnesses in 2016. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A train is ready on the station during the handover ceremony of the high-speed rail project in Vientiane, Laos, connecting the city with Kunming, China, on Dec. 3, 2021. Phoonsab Thevongsa/Reuters hide caption

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Phoonsab Thevongsa/Reuters

With U.S. focused on defense, China's trade and infrastructure sweep Southeast Asia

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Cori Berg is executive director of the Hope Day School early childhood program in Dallas. Cooper Neill for NPR hide caption

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Cooper Neill for NPR

Parents and caregivers of young children say they've hit pandemic rock bottom

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"By bringing archaeological perspectives to an active space domain, we're the first to show how people adapt their behavior to a completely new environment," Associate Professor Justin Walsh of Chapman University said of the experiment. NASA hide caption

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NASA
Klaus Kremmerz for NPR

22 tips for 2022: You can't please everyone. Here's how to say 'no' and stick with it

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Tongan Foreign Minister Fekitamoeloa 'Utoikamanu (right) is accompanied by Australian High Commissioner to Tonga Rachael Moore as they receive a Royal Australian Air Force C-17A Globemaster III aircraft delivering Australian aid at Fuaʻamotu International Airport on Thursday. Handout, Australian Defense Force/AP hide caption

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Handout, Australian Defense Force/AP

A pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Now, a nonprofit group said it has raised around $900,000 for the alleged rioters, but some of their families are raising questions about how the money is being spent. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Experts see 'red flags' at nonprofit raising big money for Capitol riot defendants

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Carl Erik Fisher, psychiatrist and author of The Urge: A History of Addiction. Beowulf Sheehan/Beowulf Sheehan hide caption

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Beowulf Sheehan/Beowulf Sheehan

'The Urge' says calling addiction a disease is misleading

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A poll worker in Austin, Texas, stamps a voter's 2020 ballot before dropping it into a secure box. Ahead of the state's March primary, local election officials in Texas are starting to deal with the effects of the new GOP-backed voting law. Sergio Flores/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Why Texas election officials are rejecting hundreds of vote-by-mail applications

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Rabbi Charlie Cytron-Walker talks to reporters following a special service arranged days after a 44-year-old British national held the rabbi and three others hostage inside the Congregation Beth Israel synagogue in Colleyville, TX. Emil Lippe/Getty Images hide caption

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Emil Lippe/Getty Images

'We can't live in fear': Texas rabbi held hostage says he'd give a stranger tea again

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U.S. President Joe Biden delivers remarks on the end of the war in Afghanistan in the State Dining Room at the White House on August 31, 2021 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The newest Girl Scout cookie, Adventurefuls, has fallen victim to supply chain and labor disruptions. The brownie-inspired treat features a caramel-flavored creme and a dash of sea salt. Bill Chappell hide caption

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Bill Chappell
Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Supreme Court hears arguments on campaign finance law, issues statement on NPR report

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Nusrat Choudhury, lead attorney for the National ACLU National Security Program, speaks with reporters following oral arguments on the ACLU No Fly List challenge, in Portland, Ore., on May 11, 2012. President Biden has nominated Choudhury to be a federal judge in the Eastern District of New York. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

A logo sign outside of a Carhartt retail store location in Cherry Hill, New Jersey on April 11, 2020. The company is facing blowback among some conservatives for its decision to press ahead with a vaccine mandate for its employees. Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters hide caption

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Kris Tripplaar/Sipa USA via Reuters

Members of Ukraine's Territorial Defense Forces take part in a Saturday morning training outside Kyiv. New members who have not yet trained with the unit must begin with the basics, and wooden mock weapons, regardless of their experience level. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Thousands of Ukrainians are training to protect their cities in case Russia invades

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"[The West is] about as far from my lived experience as you can imagine," Cumberbatch says. He plays a cattle rancher in Jane Campion's film, The Power of the Dog. Kirsty Griffin /Netflix hide caption

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Kirsty Griffin /Netflix

Benedict Cumberbatch digs into toxic masculinity in 'The Power of the Dog'

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Gov. Kevin Stitt issued an executive order on Tuesday that permits state employees to work as substitute teachers while retaining their regular jobs with no reduction in pay or benefits. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Vogue editor and fashion icon André Leon Tally attends The CW: It's A Reality at Simyone Lounge on February 23, 2010 in New York City. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images