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An Alaska Airlines plane takes off from Ronald Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, on Jan. 18, 2022. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

With airlines worried about 5G, Verizon and AT&T agree to delay rollout near airports

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The U.S. Postal Service is now taking orders for the government's free at-home coronavirus test kits. Stefania Pelfini, La Waziya Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefania Pelfini, La Waziya Photography/Getty Images

The Postal Service is now taking orders for free COVID-19 test kits

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"One of the jobs as an actor is we cannot judge our characters," Brian Cox says of the ruthless business tycoon he plays on Succession. HBO hide caption

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HBO

'Succession' actor Brian Cox can't defend Logan Roy, but he can relate to him

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President Joe Biden speaks about the government's COVID-19 response, Jan. 13, 2022. Experts say his administration's efforts have yielded mixed results in the first year Biden's been in office. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A year in, experts assess Biden's hits and misses on handling the pandemic

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, White House chief medical adviser and director of the NIAID, testifies at a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill last week. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

Activision Blizzard is behind such successful franchises as Call of Duty and Candy Crush. It is being acquired by Microsoft. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Microsoft set to acquire the gaming company Activision Blizzard for $68.7 billion

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A grocery store worker sanitizes a shopping cart at a MOM's Organic Market in Washington, D.C., in April 2020. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Workers are calling out sick in droves, leaving employers scrambling

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Fruit-eating animals spread the seeds of plants in ecosystems around the world. Their decline means plants could have a harder time finding new habitats as the climate changes. Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/DPA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

In this photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, attends a meeting of the Central Committee of the ruling Workers' Party in Pyongyang, North Korea. AP File Photo hide caption

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AP File Photo
Malaka Gharib/NPR

22 tips for 2022: Get creative, even if you aren't feeling inspired

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A woman wearing a protective mask walks past a sign in a cosmetic shop window on March 17, 2020 in London, England. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

These are the 5 things needed to stabilize the pandemic in Europe, WHO expert says

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