NPR Stories For Apple News Editor-selected NPR stories for Apple News.

NPR Stories For Apple News

A swarm of more than 50 earthquakes has been detected off the Oregon coast in the past 24 hours, prompting seismologists to reassure Pacific Northwest residents that they're not in danger. The Blanco Transform Fault Zone is very active, but it poses little threat, researchers say. USGS hide caption

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USGS

Actor Rose McGowan, who accused Weinstein of raping her more two two decades ago and then of destroying her career, joins other accusers and protesters as Harvey Weinstein arrives at a Manhattan court house for the start of his January 2020 trial in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The composer Julius Eastman died in 1990, but his music is experiencing a renaissance. The Los Angeles-based group Wild Up's jubilant recording of his 1974 work Femenine is one of the most remarkable classical albums of the year. Ron Hammond hide caption

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Ron Hammond

The Supreme Court's conservative majority has been shrinking the Constitution's wall of separation between church and state, particularly in cases dealing with religious schools. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court weighs mandating public funds for religious schools in Maine

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Members of three German parties at the signing of a coalition agreement are (from left) Social Democrats Norbert Walter-Borjan, Saskia Esken and new Chancellor Olaf Scholz, Free Democrat Christian Lindner, and the Green party's Robert Habeck and Annalena Baerbock on Tuesday in Berlin. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images

What you need to know about Germany's new chancellor and coalition government

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Members of the Movilh — Movement for Homosexual Integration and Liberation — celebrate after lawmakers approved legislation legalizing marriage and adoption by same-sex couples, in Santiago, Chile, on Tuesday. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

Saule Omarova addresses the Senate Banking Committee during her nomination hearing on Nov. 18 to head the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Omarova withdrew her nomination on Tuesday after facing opposition from Republicans and some moderate Democrats. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Biden's pick to become a key banking regulator withdraws after ugly nomination fight

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An excerpt of an apology made by Bangkok Post on Dec. 4. The Thai media outlet apologized for using racist language in a headline on a Dec. 2 story about the omicron variant. The headline read, "Government hunts for African visitors." Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

President Biden walks to Marine One outside the White House on Dec. 2. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Biden pledged to forgive $10,000 in student loan debt. Here's what he's done so far

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People line up outside a free COVID-19 vaccination site that opened Friday in Washington, D.C. The local health department is stepping up vaccination and booster shots as more cases of the omicron variant are being identified in the United States. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Dr. Naresh Aggarwal talks with Jennifer Bain, who volunteered for a study of Medicago's COVID-19 vaccine, in Toronto. More than 24,000 volunteers in six countries participated. Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images

A COVID vaccine grown in plants measures up

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Amazon drivers cheer as they go back to their their delivery vans, with systems back online at the Amazon Delivery Station in Rosemead, Calif. Amazon Web Services suffered a major outage. The company provides cloud computing services to individuals, universities, governments and companies. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

In exchange for returning millions of dollars of antiquities, financier and philanthropist Michael Steinhardt will avoid prosecution. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP