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NPR Stories For Apple News

Suffolk County Executive Steven Bellone announced fines on Wednesday against a Long Island, N.Y., country club and a resident for hosting events in violation of social-gathering limits. Screen grab by NPR/Suffolk County Executive/Facebook hide caption

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Screen grab by NPR/Suffolk County Executive/Facebook

Honduran migrants walking in a group stop before Guatemalan police in January near Agua Caliente, Guatemala. The Democratic staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee says U.S. immigration agents in Guatemala helped officials deport Hondurans traveling in a migrant caravan earlier this year. Santiago Billy/AP hide caption

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Santiago Billy/AP

A nurse conducts a coronavirus test at a mega drive-through site in July at El Paso Community College's Valle Verde campus in El Paso, Texas. Cengiz Yar/Getty Images hide caption

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Cengiz Yar/Getty Images

Amid COVID-19 Upswing, El Paso, Texas, Doctor Says ICU Is 'Surreal' And 'Strange'

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Philadelphia police issue a final warning for curfew violation to protesters at 55th and Pine Streets in West Philadelphia, on Wednesday, the third straight night of protesting and unrest after the fatal shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. by police. Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Learning to ride a bike can lead to memorable tumbles. It's the brain's "time cells," scientists now say, that help organize and seal those experiences in our minds. Peter Cade/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Cade/Getty Images

Why Some Memories Seem Like Movies: 'Time Cells' Discovered In Human Brains

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An employee adjusts desks in an empty classroom in New Delhi after schools there were closed in March. A new report finds 1 in 4 countries have either missed their planned school reopening date, or not yet set one. Yawar Nazir/Getty Images hide caption

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Yawar Nazir/Getty Images

In the early 2000s, DJ Drama's mixtapes launched artists' careers and defined a new sound. But when mixtapes became a scapegoat for the music industry's collapse, Drama took the fall. Richard Ecclestone / Redferns hide caption

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Richard Ecclestone / Redferns

The U.S. Capitol, seen here on April 13, remains closed to public tours and open only to members, staff, press and official business visitors. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A health officer in a protective suit collects a swab sample to be tested for the coronavirus on Thursday in Dharmsala, India. India's confirmed coronavirus caseload surpassed 8 million on Thursday. Ashwini Bhatia/AP hide caption

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Ashwini Bhatia/AP

Signs in the window of a retail store offers discounts, and jobs, in Santa Monica, Calif. U.S. GDP grew at a record-setting rate, reflecting pent-up activity after the coronavirus lockdowns, but economists warn of trouble ahead. Reed Saxon/Associated Press hide caption

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Reed Saxon/Associated Press

U.S. Economy Grows At Record Pace But Still Has A Long Way To Go

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Looks like your spice rack on steroids? Nope. Although the colors are a feast for the eyes. Caitlin Cunningham Photography/Forbes Pigment Collection at the Harvard Art Museums hide caption

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Caitlin Cunningham Photography/Forbes Pigment Collection at the Harvard Art Museums

Juliet Roa takes a selfie as supporters of President Trump wave flags outside an early voting location at the John F. Kennedy Library on Tuesday in Hialeah, Fla. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

People wearing face masks walk past an outdoor restaurant Wednesday in Frankfurt, Germany. To slow the spread of the coronavirus, restaurants will be closed, starting Monday. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

Nitecap is one of many New York City bars and restaurants forced to close by the pandemic. Camille Petersen hide caption

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Camille Petersen

Pandemic Means Closing Time For Many New York City Restaurants And Bars

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Khaled Jamal Abdullah after running away from home to pledge allegiance to ISIS and join the militant group as a fighter. He had just turned 16. Jamal Abdullah Naser hide caption

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Jamal Abdullah Naser

Iraqi Family Identifies Their Son As ISIS Teen At Center Of Navy War Crimes Trial

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A new mobile voting center brings voting directly to residents in Santa Cruz County, Calif. Here, the VoteMobile is parked at Garfield Park Village, an apartment complex for seniors. Erika Mahoney/KAZU hide caption

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Erika Mahoney/KAZU