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NPR Stories For Apple News

Sadie Roberts-Jones stands between Sgt. Kyle Callihan (left) and Sgt Michael Gauthier, who are with the Baton Rouge Police Department. An arrest has been made in the killing of Roberts-Jones, who was found dead in the trunk of her car last week. Courtesy of Baton Rouge Police Department hide caption

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Courtesy of Baton Rouge Police Department

Adolf Eichmann standing in a glass booth, flanked by guards, in the Jerusalem courtroom during his trial in 1961 for war crimes committed during World War II. AP hide caption

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AP

President Trump described the immigration plan presented at a Cabinet meeting on Tuesday as "the best of everything." Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

An alligator that eluded capture for a week in a Chicago park is now in custody, officials announced Tuesday. The gator is seen here in an image provided by Chicago Animal Care and Control. Kelley Gandurski/AP hide caption

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Kelley Gandurski/AP

Bacteria (purple) in the bloodstream can trigger sepsis, a life-threatening illness. Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource

Members of Black Lives Matter of Greater New York and allies hold a protest rally last month in New York City's Times Square demanding justice for Eric Garner, who died after he was put in a chokehold by an NYPD officer in 2014. Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

U.S. lawmakers will question lobbyists and officials from Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple on an array of issues. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

'Facebook Is Dangerous:' Firms In Hot Seat As Congress Probes Big Tech

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A now-closed Irish pub in Lawrence, Mass., displayed an old "Help Wanted/No Irish Need Apply" — a common sight across the country in the mid-1800s. Jonathan Wiggs/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Wiggs/Boston Globe via Getty Images

With Latest Nativist Rhetoric, Trump Takes America Back To Where It Came From

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Container ships and other maritime vessels currently run on pollutant-intensive heavy fuel oil. The world's largest container-shipping company, Maersk, has promised to make its operations zero carbon by 2050. Doing so will require using new fuels such as hydrogen. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Dawn Of Low-Carbon Shipping

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The town of Harlech in Wales is officially home to the world's steepest street, according to Guinness World Records. Dea / S. Vannini/De Agostini via Getty Images hide caption

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Dea / S. Vannini/De Agostini via Getty Images

A scene in the show 13 Reasons Why that had shown actress Katherine Langford's character taking her own life has been edited out. Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
NPR

VIDEO: Move Objects With Your Mind? We're Getting There, With The Help Of An Armband

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Musicians walk on a crosswalk painted like a piano outside the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y. Increasingly, urban designers and transportation planners say this kind of art — colorful crosswalks and engaging sidewalks — leads to safer intersections, stronger neighborhoods and better public health. Brett Dahlberg/WXXI hide caption

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Brett Dahlberg/WXXI

Walking On Painted Keys: Creative Crosswalks Meet Government Resistance

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From Right: U.S. Reps. Ayanna Pressley, Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar at a press conference at the Capitol on Monday. President Trump has accused the "squad" of hating America and has said they should "go back" to where they came from. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

'He Says Stupid Stuff': Amid Outrage, Trump Supporters Shrug Off Racist Language

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