NPR Stories For Apple News Editor-selected NPR stories for Apple News.

NPR Stories For Apple News

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello says he will not step down following the publication of private chat messages laden with misogynist and homophobic language. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

At a ceremony Monday at the White House, President Trump defended his racist tweets against Democratic lawmakers. The language used in that tweet has a long history connected with nativist political movements in the U.S. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Native Hawaiians have objected to construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope for years. On Monday, about 300 protesters arrived to block workers from accessing the site on a mountain believed to be sacred land. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

A sign at the Miami International Airport shows cancelled flights after American Airlines initially grounded its Boeing 737 Max planes in March. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Airlines Cancel Boeing Max Flights Into November; Holiday Flights Could Be Next

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741324231/741967391" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Huge crowds turn up each week to watch a game of baseball on a woodchip field, where the players wear snowshoes. Mackenzie Martin/WXPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mackenzie Martin/WXPR

Crowds Gather Each Week In Wisconsin To Watch Their Teams Play Ball — In Snowshoes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741140792/741967367" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jim Bridenstine became NASA administrator in April 2018. He says that before the space agency can send humans to Mars, it has to get them back to the moon. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Olivia Falcigno/NPR

50 Years After Apollo 11 Moon Landing, NASA Sets Its Sights On Mars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741281881/741967379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Bank of England's new 50-pound note will feature mathematician Alan Turing, honoring the code-breaker who helped lay the foundation for computer science. Bank of England hide caption

toggle caption
Bank of England

Alan Turing, Computing Genius And WWII Hero, To Be On U.K.'s New 50-Pound Note

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741759995/742004372" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

James Fields Jr. killed a woman after he drove a car into a group of protesters in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017. On Monday, a judge in Virginia sentenced him to life in prison. Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via Getty Images

The Danish company Maersk has been shipping goods around the world since the age of steamships. Now it wants to usher in a new era, with carbon neutral transport. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Hecker/Getty Images

Giant Shipper Bets Big On Ending Its Carbon Emissions. Will It Pay Off?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/736565697/741967397" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Emily Nussbaum received the most hate mail of her career after she panned season 1 of HBO's True Detective. "Most of it was handwritten," she says. C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House hide caption

toggle caption
C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House

We All Watch In Our Own Way: A Critic Tracks The 'TV Revolution'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741146427/741897644" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic Reps. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota (from left), Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan respond to racist remarks directed at them by President Trump at a news conference on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A migrant family waits in Tijuana, Mexico, before being transported to the San Ysidro port of entry to begin the process of applying for asylum in the United States. A new Trump administration rule says immigrants who pass through a third country en route to the U.S. cannot apply for asylum at the U.S. southern border. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

Trump Administration Implementing '3rd Country' Rule On Migrants Seeking Asylum

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/741769333/741823558" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Helen Harris, a former systems engineer for Dell, says her career was derailed a few years ago because of the way she looks. She was born and identifies as a woman. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elias Williams for NPR

'It's A Career Ender': 2 LGBTQ Former Dell Workers Share Their Stories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/740726966/741735613" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota speaks to supporters at the Polish Princess Bakery in Lancaster, N.H. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tamara Keith/NPR

Protesters against gerrymandering at a March 2019 rally coinciding with Supreme Court hearings on major redistricting cases. After the court said the federal judiciary has no role in partisan redistricting cases, legal action is focused on state courts. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

North Carolina Gerrymandering Trial Could Serve As Blueprint For Other States

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/740842847/741721730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Taking care of a newborn can be relentless and at some point, many parents need the baby to sleep — alone and quietly — for a few hours. So what does science say about the controversial practice of sleep training? Scott Bakal for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Bakal for NPR

Sleep Training Truths: What Science Can (And Can't) Tell Us About Crying It Out

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/730339536/741721748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democrats are hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right. But it's unclear whether that outreach will resonate with voters who make up the religious middle. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
A-Digit/Getty Images

Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/740992033/741721742" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Augusta Savage was an artist, educator, activist and community leader. Her work is the focus of an exhibition at the New-York Historical Society, organized by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens. She's pictured above with her 1938 sculpture Realization. New-York Historical Society hide caption

toggle caption
New-York Historical Society

Sculptor Augusta Savage Said Her Legacy Was The Work Of Her Students

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/740459875/741721736" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript