NPR Stories For Apple News Editor-selected NPR stories for Apple News.

NPR Stories For Apple News

Hermione Dickey, 8, and her mother, Priscilla, are among the passengers on a U.S. evacuation flight out of Wuhan, China. She's seen here during the car ride to Wuhan Tianhe International Airport. Priscilla Dickey via AP hide caption

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Priscilla Dickey via AP

Coronavirus: Americans Cheer As Evacuation Flight From Wuhan Reaches U.S.

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A blockade erected by villagers just outside the city of Nanchang, Jiangxi. The sign says "outside people and cars forbidden from entering." Residents say hundreds of migrant workers returned from Wuhan for the lunar new year holiday and are now not allowed to leave. Emily Feng/NPR hide caption

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Emily Feng/NPR

Computer mouse pads with "Secure the Vote" logos on them sit on a vendor's table at an election officials conference in 2018. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

1 Simple Step Could Help Election Security. Governments Aren't Doing It

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House Democratic impeachment manager Rep. Adam Schiff (second from left) leaves a news conference on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

A Brightline train approaches a railroad crossing on Jan. 18, 2018, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. In its first two years, more than 40 people have been killed by Brightline trains on tracks and at rail crossings. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

In a photo taken in May, customers enjoy their drinks at a Starbucks in Beijing. The U.S.-based coffee chain has decided to close more than half its stores in mainland China due to the coronavirus outbreak. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

President Trump's personal lawyer Jay Sekulow (left) and White House counsel Pat Cipollone arrive at the Senate chamber Tuesday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A sketch artist's rendering of White House counsel Pat Cipollone speaking in the Senate chamber during the impeachment trial against President Trump on Jan. 21. In the trial, senators play the role of jurors, and Chief Justice John Roberts presides. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Waves splash in a pool during an earthquake in the Cayman Islands. Social media was flooded with photos and video from people documenting the event. Realvision.com via Reuters hide caption

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Realvision.com via Reuters

"That reporter couldn't have done too good a job on you yesterday," President Trump told Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Tuesday. He added, "Think you did a good job on her, actually." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Travelers wait at the ride-share pickup location at Sacramento International Airport. Uber is allowing drivers at three California airports to set their own fares. Scott Rodd/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Scott Rodd/Capital Public Radio

Due To New California Law, Uber Allows Some Drivers To Set Their Own Rates

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Willie O'Ree (left) and Howie Young (center) of the Los Angeles Blades talk during warm ups before their game at the Los Angeles Sports Arena during the 1963-64 season in Los Angeles, Calif. O'Ree became the first black player in the National Hockey League when he joined the Boston Bruins in 1958. B Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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B Bennett/Getty Images

Black Hockey Players Celebrated In NHL's Mobile History Museum

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An FBI affidavit that lays out the case against Charles Lieber includes what federal prosecutors say is a contract between the Harvard researcher and a university in China. U.S. Attorney's Office/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office/Screenshot by NPR

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar led a press briefing Tuesday laying out the agency's strategy for preventing the novel form of coronavirus from taking hold in the U.S. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

As China's Coronavirus Cases Rise, U.S. Agencies Map Out Domestic Containment Plans

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Amid impeachment and the 2020 election, surveys show political fevers running high at work, undercutting trust and productivity. And workers and employers are bracing for those dynamics to get worse. John M Lund Photography Inc/Getty Images hide caption

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John M Lund Photography Inc/Getty Images

I Can't Work With You! How Political Fights Leave Workplaces Divided

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From left to right, Mick Jones, Joe Strummer and Paul Simonon of The Clash, circa 1980. The band's classic album London Calling was released in the United States 40 years ago this month. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

'London Calling' At 40: Greil Marcus Revisits His Original Review

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A helicopter flies in Brazil in 2014. Some helicopter trips — like personal or private helicopter rides — are more likely than others to end in a fatal accident. Warren Little/Getty Images hide caption

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Warren Little/Getty Images