NPR Stories For Apple News Editor-selected NPR stories for Apple News.

NPR Stories For Apple News

South Dakota Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg, pictured in 2019, is facing impeachment proceedings and calls to resign after the release of new details about the September 2020 car crash in which he fatally struck a pedestrian. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP
Department of Justice/NPR

The Capitol Siege: The Arrested And Their Stories

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Robert Stewart was one of the first Black officers hired by LAPD. He was terminated in 1900 and on Tuesday the Los Angeles Police Commission unanimously voted to have him reinstated to retire with honor. LAPD handout hide caption

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LAPD handout

Sepsis, which is sometimes called blood poisoning, is essentially the body's overreaction to an infection. Kateryna Kon/Science Source hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Source

Vitamin C Fails Again As Treatment For Sepsis

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President Joe Biden, pictured on the campaign trail in Nov. 2020, has long encouraged Americans to mask up in the fight against COVID-19. On Wednesday, his administration announced it will provide 25 million masks to community health centers and food banks across the country. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

The cost of repairing or replacing historical items damaged in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot "will be considerable," Architect of the Capitol J. Brett Blanton told lawmakers Wednesday. Other costs include maintaining a security fence topped with razor wire that surrounds the U.S. Capitol grounds. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Xavier Becerra, President Biden's nominee for secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, contended with critics of abortion rights on the first day of his confirmation hearings Tuesday. Sarah Silbiger/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/POOL/AFP via Getty Images
Penguin Random House

A Botched Execution Leads To A Search For Answers In 'Two Truths And A Lie'

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Tim O'Brien was a foot soldier during the Vietnam War. "The problem for me really is that I questioned the rectitude of the war," he says. "I thought I was doing the wrong thing by being there." Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures hide caption

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Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

Tim O'Brien On Late-In-Life Fatherhood And The Things He Carried From Vietnam

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Andrea D'Aquino for NPR

Millions Of Kids Learn English At School. Teaching Them Remotely Hasn't Been Easy

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Presiding judge Anne Kerber (left) stands before handing the verdict to Syrian defendant Eyad al-Gharib (right, face hidden under a folder) Wednesday in Koblenz. Gharib, 44, a former Syrian intelligence service agent, was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in jail for complicity in crimes against humanity in the first court case over state-sponsored torture by the Syrian government. Thomas Lohnes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Lohnes/AFP via Getty Images

A medical worker gives a coronavirus vaccine shot to a patient at a vaccination facility in Beijing, in January. Two pharmaceutical companies in China announced Wednesday they are seeking market approval for new vaccines. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Visitors walk past the giant word "Data" during the Guiyang International Big Data Expo 2016 in southwestern China. China says it's determined to be a leader in using artificial intelligence to sort through big data. U.S. officials say the Chinese efforts include the collection of hundreds of millions of records on U.S. citizens. The photo was released by China's Xinhua News Agency. AP hide caption

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AP

China Wants Your Data — And May Already Have It

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Amy Sherald, who painted the official portrait of Michelle Obama, appeared in the film Black Art: In the Absence of Light. HBO hide caption

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HBO

'Black Art' Chronicles A Pivotal Exhibition And Its Lasting Impact On Black Artists

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A health care worker looks away as she's immunized with Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine at Klerksdorp Hospital in Klerksdorp, South Africa, on Feb. 18. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images