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Zika Virus

Anti-Zika advice applied to a wall in front of a housing project in the Puerta de Tierras section of San Juan, Puerto Rico. This public health message was part of an island-wide effort to stem the spread of Zika. Angel Valentin/Getty Images hide caption

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Angel Valentin/Getty Images

Protest signs at the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District board's meeting Saturday in Marathon, Fla. Greg Allen/Greg Allen hide caption

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Greg Allen/Greg Allen

Florida Keys Approves Trial Of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes To Fight Zika

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A Florida Department of Health employee processes a urine sample to test for the Zika virus on Sept. 14 in Miami Beach. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Reporter's Notebook: Pregnant And Caught In Zika Test Limbo

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Chinashama Sainvilus is one of three babies born with microcephaly at the Mirebalais Hospital in Haiti in July. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Doctors Fear Zika Is A Sleeping Giant In Haiti

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Twin girls born with extremely small heads, shrunken spinal cords and extra folds of skin around the skull. Scientists think this skin forms when the skull collapses onto itself after the brain —€” but not the skull —€” stops growing. The images of the girls' heads were constructed on the computer using CT scans taken shortly after birth. The girls were infected with Zika at 9 weeks gestation. Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America hide caption

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Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

Containers hold genetically modified Aedes aegypti mosquitoes before being released in Panama City, Panama, in September 2014. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Arnulfo Franco/AP

Florida Keys Opposition Stalls Tests Of Genetically Altered Mosquitoes

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A health department pickup truck sprays insecticide against mosquitoes in a San Juan, Puerto Rico, neighborhood in January. Alvin Baez/Reuters hide caption

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Alvin Baez/Reuters

Zika Cases Surge In Puerto Rico As Mosquitoes Flourish

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is updating its guidelines on preventing transmission of Zika virus via sexual activity. Stephanie Lynn/Flickr Flash/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Lynn/Flickr Flash/Getty Images

Mosquitoes in traps are transported back to the county's laboratory for analysis. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media

Mosquito Hunters Set Traps Across Houston, Search for Signs of Zika

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