Missed Treatment NPR and Colorado Public Radio investigate the Army's dismissal of soldiers who have returned from combat with mental health problems.

The Pentagon building complex is seen from Air Force One on June 29. An Army review concludes that commanders did nothing wrong when they kicked out more than 22,000 soldiers for misconduct after they came back from Iraq or Afghanistan – even though all of those troops had been diagnosed with mental health problems or brain injuries. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Senators, Military Specialists Say Army Report On Dismissed Soldiers Is Troubling

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Larry Morrison, who returned home with post-traumatic stress disorder after four tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, is being kicked out of the Army for misconduct, leaving him without military benefits. Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Michael de Yoanna/Colorado Public Radio

Senators Want Moratorium On Dismissing Soldiers During Investigation

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Evans Army Community Hospital, which stands on the Fort Carson military base, is a central part of the base's behavioral health system. Courtesy of Evans Army Community Hospital/U.S. Army hide caption

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Courtesy of Evans Army Community Hospital/U.S. Army

Lawmakers Call For Army To Investigate Misconduct Discharges Of Service Members

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