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ANNAPOLIS, MD - JULY 02: The Capital newspaper's logo is stenciled onto a newspaper vending machine following last week's shooting at the community newspaper's office July 2, 2018 in Annapolis, Maryland. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Selene San Felice's editor, Rob Hiaasen, was killed during the shooting. She was assigned a new editor, and even though their first edit went well, she said, "It felt so bad to get that from somebody that wasn't Rob." She went out in the hallway and cried. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

ANNAPOLIS, MD - JUNE 28: Pat Furgurson (right), a reporter for the Capital Gazette, awaits a press briefing involving today's shooting in Annapolis, Maryland, on June 28, 2018. (Photo by Calla Kessler/The Washington Post via Getty Images) The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Capital Gazette: "I Know He Did It"

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Rick Hutzell, right, the editor for the Capital Gazette, is joined by staff members, from left, reporter Selene San Felice, and photojournalists Paul W. Gillespie and Joshua McKerrow, as he rings a bell during a moment of silence at 2:33 p.m. to commemorate their fallen co-workers on Thursday, July 5, 2018. Brian Krista/Baltimore Sun/Tribune News Service via Getty I hide caption

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Brian Krista/Baltimore Sun/Tribune News Service via Getty I

Capital Gazette: "It's OK That We're Alive"

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The front page of The Capital Gazette newspaper the day after a mass shooting occured at the paper's office. Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage/NPR

Capital Gazette: "A Damn Paper"

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Mitchell MacNaughton/NPR Mitchell MacNaughton/NPR hide caption

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Mitchell MacNaughton/NPR

Coming Soon: The Capital Gazette

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Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol, breaking windows in the historic building and clashing with the Capitol Police on Jan. 6. Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

January 6: Inside The Capitol Siege

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Sen. Mitch McConnell speaks at a news conference on Miguel A. Estrada's withdrawal of his nomination to be a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. That day, Republicans castigated Democrats for "obstructing" the nominations of Estrada and other judicial candidates. Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images

Essential Mitch: The Judges

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks to a closed-door GOP policy lunch on Capitol Hill in 2016. Senate Republicans, including McConnell, argued that appointing a Supreme Court justice was too important to be determined by a lame-duck president. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Essential Mitch: The Interview

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell escorts President Donald Trump after a meeting in McConnell's office. Bill Clark/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/Getty Images

Essential Mitch: The Trump Question

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Sen. John McCain and Sen. Mitch McConnell talk to reporters after a meeting on the campaign finance reform bill in 2002. Scott J. Ferrell/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott J. Ferrell/Getty Images

Sens. Mitch McConnell and John McCain walk down a corridor to a TV studio, where they will discuss their different positions on the McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform bill. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

Essential Mitch: The Money, Part 1

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Mitch McConnell was elected Jefferson County judge-executive in 1977 and was re-elected in 1981. Lexington Herald-Leader/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Lexington Herald-Leader/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Essential Mitch: The Early Years

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In surveillance video, an unarmed black man Markeis McGlockton (far left) is shot by Michael Drejka, who is white, during an altercation a the parking lot in Clearwater, Fla., in July 2018. Pinellas County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Pinellas County Sheriff's Office via AP

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell listens as President Trump speaks to reporters following a meeting at the White House in October 2017. Illustration by Alvaro Tapia Hidalgo for NPR | Photograph by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Illustration by Alvaro Tapia Hidalgo for NPR | Photograph by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'You May Need The Money More Than I Do': McConnell Once Returned Trump's Donation

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The disclosure of millions of once-secret tobacco industry documents — which are now readily searchable online — has opened a window into Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's interactions with tobacco executives and lobbyists. Alvaro Tapia Hidalgo for NPR hide caption

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Alvaro Tapia Hidalgo for NPR

Tobacco's 'Special Friend': What Internal Documents Say About Mitch McConnell

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Past practices offer few clues about where special counsel Robert Mueller might take the Russia probe — and then what might happen when it's over. Alex Wong/AP hide caption

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Alex Wong/AP

What Could Be Coming Next In Robert Mueller's Russia Investigation

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Once special counsel Robert Mueller unveiled charges against George Papadopoulos, a former foreign policy adviser to the Trump 2016 presidential campaign, the White House insisted he didn't play an important role in the campaign. Papadopoulos' fiancée Simona Mangiante vigorously defends him. Simona Mangiante hide caption

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Simona Mangiante

Trump SoHo Hotel Condominium looms over its neighborhood of Hudson Square in lower Manhattan. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Trump SoHo: A Shiny Hotel Wrapped In Glass, But Hiding Mysteries

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The Trump National Golf Club in Rancho Palos Verdes, seen in 2005, has removed a list of charitable donations it once posted on its website. An NPR examination of that list reveals inconsistencies and errors. Jeff Gross/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Gross/Getty Images

A Trump Golf Course Said It Gave Millions To Charity. Here's What The Numbers Say

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