School Money Is the way we pay for our nation's schools failing to meet the needs of our most vulnerable students? School Money, a nationwide collaboration between NPR's Ed Team and 20 member station reporters explores this question.
School Money

School Money

The cost of opportunity

A Connecticut judge wrote in a scathing review of the state's public education system: "The state's definition of what it means to have a secondary education is like a sugar-cube boat. It dissolves before it's half launched." LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

High school students perform 10467, a play they wrote about how their education has been affected by lack of resources. Beth Fertig/WNYC hide caption

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Beth Fertig/WNYC

NYC Teens Spotlight School Funding Woes On Stage

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Pendleton Superintendent Jon Peterson (right) and Pendleton High School principal Dan Greenough look over a storage lot next to the high school. It used to be full of student projects. With the wood shop closed, there's little here. Rob Manning/OPB hide caption

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Rob Manning/OPB

How Much Does It Cost To Educate A Student In Michigan? (Or, In The U.S.?)

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Douglas Bruce, a driving force behind TABOR, celebrates at a victory party in downtown Denver after Amendment 1 was projected to pass. Jay Koelzer/Rocky Mountain News/CPR hide caption

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Jay Koelzer/Rocky Mountain News/CPR

Pushing The Brake On Education Funding In Colorado

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Wichita lawyer Alan Rupe in his office. He's been suing Kansas over school funding since 1989. Sam Zeff/KCUR hide caption

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Sam Zeff/KCUR

Kansas Supreme Court Says Schools Could Close If System Doesn't Change

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Katie Park, Alyson Hurt and Lisa Charlotte Rost/NPR

Is There A Better Way To Pay For America's Schools?

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Kennedy Park, 4, is in her second year of pre-K in Camden. All 3- and 4-year-old kids qualify for two years of preschool in New Jersey's lowest-income cities. Sarah Gonzalez/WNYC hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/WNYC

Taking On Poverty And Education In School Costs A Lot Of Money

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The Millers sit in the living room of their home in a Philadelphia suburb. They are part of an ongoing lawsuit, which argues that Pennsylvania has neglected its constitutional responsibility to provide all children a "thorough and efficient" education. Emily Cohen for NPR hide caption

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Emily Cohen for NPR

Struggling School Districts Find Little Help In Pennsylvania

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A social studies class at Campton Elementary School in Wolfe County, Ky. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Kentucky's Unprecedented Success In School Funding Is On The Line

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Karen English has taught in the Revere, Mass., schools for 36 years. Kirk Carapezza/WGBH hide caption

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Kirk Carapezza/WGBH

How Massachusetts Became The Best State In Education

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Inside Livingston Junior High School in Sumter County, Ala. The state does not send extra dollars to districts that serve low-income kids. Dan Carsen/WBHM hide caption

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Dan Carsen/WBHM

'Why Can't Our Kids Go To School Together?' Asks Board Member In Alabama

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Tiffany Anderson (right), superintendent of the Jennings School District in north St. Louis County, Mo., performs crosswalk duty every morning to save the district money. Tim Lloyd/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Tim Lloyd/St. Louis Public Radio

Why Did The Superintendent Cross The Road? To Save Money For Her Schools

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