Back At Base: Stories On Veterans Choice As part of a series chronicling the lives of America's troops at home, NPR — together with member stations from around the country — is examining a troubled VA health care program.

Widowed while pregnant with their second son, Gloria Grijalva shares pictures of her husband, U.S. Army veteran Charlie Grijalva, who committed suicide in December 2014. KPBS hide caption

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KPBS

VA Hospitals Still Struggling With Adding Staff Despite Billions From Choice Act

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Doctors Must Overcome New Red Tape In Struggle To Treat Veterans

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Psychologist Diane Adams devotes a portion of her private practice in Renton, Wash., to veterans. But she said the bureaucracy involved in the Veterans Choice program has proved frustrating and veterans have had a hard time getting approval to see her. Patricia Murphy/KUOW hide caption

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Patricia Murphy/KUOW

For Doctors And Patients, 'Veterans Choice' Often Means Long Waits

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Navy veteran Amanda Wirtz looks through her correspondence with the Veterans Choice program. After the VA couldn't get her an appointment with a specialist, it sent her to the Choice program. But she still was unable to get an appointment for several months. Courtesy of KPBS hide caption

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Courtesy of KPBS

How Congress And The VA Left Many Veterans Without A 'Choice'

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"Some days I wake up and go, 'Am I wasting time, when I could be on chemotherapy or getting a surgery?' " asks Tony Lapinski, a Montana veteran who worries about what is causing his severe back pain. Michael Albans for NPR hide caption

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Michael Albans for NPR

Despite $10B 'Fix,' Veterans Are Waiting Even Longer To See Doctors

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Steve and Janet Singleton, both Navy veterans, have lived in Clarksville, Tenn., for about a year. Steve couldn't get into the local VA clinic last spring, so now they have to drive to the Nashville clinic or pay out of pocket for medical care. Emily Siner/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Emily Siner/Nashville Public Radio

Overcrowding Forces Tennessee VA Clinic To Stop Accepting New Patients

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Irvin Bishop Small at his home in York, Pa. Quil Lawrence/NPR hide caption

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Quil Lawrence/NPR

For The VA's Broken Health System, The Fix Needs A Fix

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