Refugee Scientists The stories of refugee scientists and those who dared to help them

Nedal Said risked everything to rejoin the scientific community. Erik Nelson Rodriguez for NPR hide caption

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Erik Nelson Rodriguez for NPR

Web Comic: A Scientist Runs For His Life And Finds His Dream

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"In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea," says Eqbal Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her "naughty" spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Sanjit Das for NPR hide caption

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Sanjit Das for NPR

She May Be The Most Unstoppable Scientist In The World

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Mohammad Al Abdallah, the executive director of the Syria Justice and Accountability Centre, shows a video that was posted to YouTube of illegal cluster bombing in Syria. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Activists Build Human Rights Abuse Cases With Help From Cellphone Videos

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Carmen Bachmann founded "Chance for Science," a website that connects refugee academics with scientists working in Germany. Thomas Victor for NPR hide caption

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Thomas Victor for NPR

While Others Saw Refugees, This German Professor Saw Human Potential

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Having volunteers who are learning German answer questions about grammar and semantics of the language while inside an MRI machine might show particular patterns in brain changes, researchers say. They hope their study could offer clues to how the brain best learns a second language. selimaksan/Getty Images hide caption

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selimaksan/Getty Images

Learning German In The Name Of Science And Cross-Cultural Collaboration

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