Turning The Tables Turning The Tables

On this episode of World Cafe, we discuss Bonnie Raitt's 1989 release Nick of Time. Terry Wyatt/Getty Images for Americana Music hide caption

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Terry Wyatt/Getty Images for Americana Music

Turning The Tables: Women Of Roots and Americana

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Betty Cantor-Jackson worked as the sound engineer for The Grateful Dead on official live and studio albums — and perhaps more importantly, recorded hundreds of reels of prized soundboard tape. Ed Perlstein/Redferns hide caption

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Ed Perlstein/Redferns

In May 2016, Sally Gross conducted a weekend-long, women only, studio lock-in in she called "Let's Change The Record" to address the lack of women in production and engineering. Prisca Lobjoy hide caption

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Prisca Lobjoy

Tori Amos (shown here performing in 2009) was part of a wave of women musicians who took the reins, creatively and professionally, over their music in the '90s. Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images hide caption

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Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images

Beyoncé and Solange onstage at Coachella in 2014. Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Coachella hide caption

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Coachella

Turning The Tables Listening Party: A Dynamic Sister Duo

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Musician and spiritual leader Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda released Journey In Satchidananda, the album that would become synonymous with her sound, in 1971. Echoes/Redferns hide caption

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Echoes/Redferns

Mary Margaret O'Hara gained critical acclaim and a cult following with her 1988 album Miss America; last year, Perfume Genius' Mike Hadreas invited her to perform at the Dutch festival Le Guess Who? Hiroyuki Ito/Getty Images hide caption

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Hiroyuki Ito/Getty Images

In her music, Bessie Smith — known as the "Empress Of The Blues" — communicated the kind of outward urgency and inner stillness that often signals the telling of an absolute truth. Carl Van Vechten Photograph Collection/Library of Congress hide caption

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Carl Van Vechten Photograph Collection/Library of Congress

The North Star Grassman And The Ravens cemented Sandy Denny as one of British music's most cherished voices. Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Getty Images

With her family bands, Maybelle Carter — shown here, sitting, with her daughters June, Anita and Helen — helped create the sound of modern country music. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Jamaican reggae singer Marcia Griffiths performed as one of Bob Marley's backing singers — and is a remarkable solo artist in her own right. Graham Wood/Getty Images hide caption

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Graham Wood/Getty Images

Singer Cesária Évora lifted Cape Verde's little-known blues, morna, beyond the island and into the international world of music. VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images