Lost Mothers: Maternal Mortality In The U.S. Special Correspondent Renee Montagne teamed up with ProPublica's Nina Martin for a six-month long investigation on maternal mortality in the U.S.

Alicia Nichols holds her daughter Diana in her home in February. After the birth of Diana, Nichols suffered unusual postpartum blood loss that she feels was not taken seriously by her doctor. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

For Every Woman Who Dies In Childbirth In The U.S., 70 More Come Close

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Under sweeping new recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, doctors would see new mothers sooner and more frequently, and insurers would cover the increased visits. FatCamera/Getty Images hide caption

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FatCamera/Getty Images

Leah Bahrencu, 35, of Austin, Texas, developed an infection after an emergency C-section to deliver twins Lukas and Sorana, now 11 months. Ilana Panich-Linsman hide caption

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Ilana Panich-Linsman

The maternal mortality rate in the U.S. is the highest among affluent nations. Researchers believe that with better education, postpartum nurses could help mothers identify life-threatening complications. Mart Klein/Getty Images hide caption

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Mart Klein/Getty Images

Many Nurses Lack Knowledge Of Health Risks To Mothers After Childbirth

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Marie McCausland holds her newborn shortly after delivery. A ProPublica/NPR story about preeclampsia prompted her to seek emergency treatment when she developed symptoms days after giving birth. Courtesy of Marie McCausland hide caption

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Courtesy of Marie McCausland

Using a mannequin to simulate dangerous scenarios, a team at Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center learns standard treatments for obstetric emergencies like hemorrhage. Bethany Mollenkof for NPR hide caption

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Bethany Mollenkof for NPR

To Keep Women From Dying In Childbirth, Look To California

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