Following Up Goats and Soda looks back at some of our favorite stories.
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Isabelita Vinuya, 88, reflected in mirror, bids farewell to Perla Bulaon Balingit in the village of Mapaniqui in Pampanga. They are two of the last living "comfort women" of the Philippines. On Nov. 23, 1944, Vinuya, Balingit and some 100 other girls and women were taken to the Red House and systematically raped by the Japanese Imperial Army. Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR

A meeting of the table banking group at the home of a member. The photo is from 2019, when No Sex for Fish (and the village) were thriving. Julia Gunther for NPR hide caption

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Julia Gunther for NPR

A road blockade set up during the Nipah virus outbreak in the southern Indian state of Kerala this month. C.K. Thanseer/DeFodi Images via Getty Images hide caption

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C.K. Thanseer/DeFodi Images via Getty Images

Patrick returned to Malawi in November 2020. He and Fiona aren't certain when they can see each other again but are looking forward to their reunion and wedding. Julia Gunther for NPR hide caption

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Julia Gunther for NPR

Angeline Murimirwa, executive director of the girls' education group CAMFED in Africa, at a pub in Oxford, England, in 2018. In August, CAMFED was awarded the $2.5 million 2021 Hilton Humanitarian Prize. Marc Silver/NPR hide caption

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Marc Silver/NPR

M. dances at a go-go bar. She was working as a topless dancer — and also as a sex worker — in the tourist city of Pattaya, Thailand, until the bar closed down in January. She decided to return to her hometown to look for work in a different sector. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

In this screen grab from video posted by BBC News Hindi, Jyoti Kumari, then 15, rides with her father during their 700-mile journey to their family's village of Sirhulli in eastern India. BBC News Hindi hide caption

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BBC News Hindi

Left: Xi Lu traveled to Wuhan from London in January to spend Lunar New Year with his parents, having not shared the holiday with them in over 7 years. Lin Yang, an epidemiologist at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, traveled to Wuhan to visit her parents for the Lunar New Year. And then ... they couldn't get back home because of the quarantine. Xi Lu/ Lin Yang hide caption

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Xi Lu/ Lin Yang

Farmers Anil Geela, left, and Pilli Tirupati do their version of the Kiki Challenge, dancing to Drake's song "In My Feelings." In the mud. With oxen. My Village Show Vlogs via YouTube/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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My Village Show Vlogs via YouTube/screenshot by NPR

A paramedic takes a blood sample from a baby for an HIV test in Larkana, Pakistan, on May 9. The government has been offering screenings in response to an HIV outbreak. Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images

Man Kaur of India celebrates after competing in the 100-meter sprint in the 100+ age category at the World Masters Games in Auckland, New Zealand, in April 2017. Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Bradley/AFP/Getty Images

First lady Rula Ghani at the Presidential Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan. Earlier this year, she helped free more than 190 Afghan women and girls imprisoned for failing the virginity test after reproductive rights activist Farhad Javid brought it to her attention in October. Kiana Hayeri/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiana Hayeri/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Laborers in the sugar cane fields of Central America are experiencing a rapid and unexplained form of kidney failure. Above: Harvesting sugar cane in Chichigalpa, Nicaragua. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Whatever Happened To ... The Mysterious Kidney Disease Striking Central America?

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Rosy does dishes — voluntarily. Getting the 2-year-old involved in chores did lead to the kitchen being flooded and dishes being broken. But now she is still eager to help. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

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Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR

Tima Kurdi holds her necklace bearing a photograph of her nephews, Alan (left) and Ghalib Kurdi. She is the author of The Boy on the Beach: My Family's Escape from Syria and Our Hope for a New Home. Ben Stansall /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall /AFP/Getty Images

Kennedy Odede (in blue shirt) is dancing for a good reason. The charity he and his wife started has been awarded the $2 million Hilton Humanitarian Prize. He's joined by residents of Kibera, the neighborhood in Nairobi where his nonprofit group provides educational, health and clean water services. Anwar Sadat hide caption

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Anwar Sadat