Changing The World One Invention At A Time The path to invention is not a straight forward one. Watch animated videos that explore the many facets of invention including: serendipity, failure, inspiration and courage.
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Changing The World One Invention At A Time

An artist's rendering shows a needle-like carbon nanotube delivering DNA through the wall of a plant cell. It also may be possible to use this method to inject a gene editing tool called CRISPR to alter a plant's characteristics for breeding. Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry hide caption

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Courtesy of Markita del Carpio Landry

Scientists Thread A Nano-Needle To Modify The Genes Of Plants

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A team of researchers in Boston has developed an insulin-delivery system that injects the medicine directly into the stomach wall, which is painless. Felice Frankel/MIT hide caption

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Felice Frankel/MIT

Avoiding The Ouch: Scientists Are Working On Ways To Swap The Needle For A Pill

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As a child on a New York farm, Eben Bayer helped his dad shovel wood chips in the barn. That's where he noticed a stretchy web of fungus that became the basis of his biodegradable packing material. NPR hide caption

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NPR

A cubesat, like this briefcase-sized MarCO, was key to relaying telemetry during the recent InSight mission to Mars. It was the first time this kind of mini-spacecraft had flown into deep space. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

What's Next For Tiny Satellites?

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Avi Ofer for NPR

How Moldy Hay And Sick Cows Led To A Lifesaving Drug

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Stanford bioengineering professor Manu Prakash looked to a children's toy to create a hand-powered centrifuge for processing blood tests. Kurt Hickman /Stanford University hide caption

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Kurt Hickman /Stanford University

Children's Whirligig Toy Inspires a Low-Cost Laboratory Test

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