Environment And Energy Collaborative Original reporting on energy and the environment from NPR and member station reporters around the country.
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Environment And Energy Collaborative

Original reporting on climate, environmental policy, and an energy system in transition.

The Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo. Democrats in some midterm swing races are targeting the Trump administration's environmental rollbacks and climate denial. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

Jeff Van Horn, a land surveyor for the oil and gas industry, worries that Colorado's Proposition 112 would hurt industry growth. It seeks to dramatically increase the distance between wells and homes to 2,500 feet. Grace Hood/CPR hide caption

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Grace Hood/CPR

Colorado's Anti-Fracking Measure Would Keep Wells Farther Away From Homes And Schools

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Old-Growth Forests May Help Songbirds Cope With Warming Climate

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Horsham, Pa., is one of many towns around the country grappling with potentially harmful chemicals in its water. They're known as PFAS, and they're linked to cancer and other illnesses. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Decades-Old Chemicals, New Angst Over Drinking Water

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Philadelphia International is among more than a dozen major U.S. airports vulnerable to sea level rise. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Airports At Water's Edge Battle Rising Sea Levels

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Protesters disrupt construction of the Bayou Bridge Pipeline in early September. Trespassing near pipelines is now a felony offense in Louisiana, punishable by up to five years in prison. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

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Travis Lux/WWNO

Tougher Laws On Pipeline Protests Face Test In Louisiana

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Model 3 sedans sit on display outside a Tesla showroom. For California to reach its ambitious climate change goals, every vehicle sold by 2040 in the state will have to be a zero-emissions vehicle. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Gov. Brown's Biggest Climate Foe Isn't Trump. It's Car-Loving Californians

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Many coastal research labs, like the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, face increased flooding from rising seas. Alex Kolker/South Wings hide caption

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Alex Kolker/South Wings

Coastal Labs Studying Increased Flooding Consider Moving Because Of Increased Flooding

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The city of Austin is installing cameras that will let residents see rising floodwaters at key intersections. Eddie Gaspar/KUT hide caption

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Eddie Gaspar/KUT

As Warming Climate Brings More Flash Floods, Austin Tries To Help Drivers

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The Dry Fork Station coal-fired power plant in Gillette, Wyo., supplies electricity across the West. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Coal Country: EPA Plan Is Short Term Boost, No Solution For Industry Decline

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Mario Ramos (left) and wife Tally adjust their umbrellas in Laguna Beach, Calif. The state was among a number of places this summer that experienced their highest temperatures on record. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Environmental groups opposing the Constitution Pipeline rally outside the state Capitol on Tuesday, April 5, 2016, in Albany, N.Y. Mike Groll/AP hide caption

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Mike Groll/AP

Activists Have A New Strategy To Block Gas Pipelines: State's Rights

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Fisherman Darius Kasprzak searches for cod in the Gulf of Alaska. The cod population there is at its lowest level on record. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Feidt for NPR

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

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A yellow-bellied marmot keeps an eye out while it gets a bite to eat. Related to groundhogs, yellow-bellied marmots are getting fatter and bigger because of the longer growing season brought on by climate change. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Spring Is Springing Sooner, Throwing Nature's Rhythms Out Of Whack

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The way cows digest food takes a lot of energy and generates a lot of heat. This makes them lose their appetite and produce less milk. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

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Mose Buchele/KUT

As Milk Production Cools In Summer, Farmers Try To Help Cows Take The Heat

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Matt Mawson/Getty Images

Phoenix Tries To Reverse Its 'Silent Storm' Of Heat Deaths

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Entering the control room at Three Mile Island Unit 1 is like stepping back in time. Except for a few digital screens and new counters, much of the equipment is original to 1974, when the plant began generating electricity. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

As Nuclear Struggles, A New Generation Of Engineers Is Motivated By Climate Change

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The view along the South Platte River in the Pike National Forest, in 1903 and 2012. When wildfires burn in dense forests today they are often hotter and can destroy more trees. Denver Water Department archives and Paula Fornwalt/U.S. Forest Service hide caption

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Denver Water Department archives and Paula Fornwalt/U.S. Forest Service

Debris and cars clog the Patapsco River in Ellicott City, Md., after flooding on May 27 that killed one person and destroyed much of the town's Main Street. David McFadden/AP hide caption

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David McFadden/AP

More Rain, More Development Spell Disaster For Some U.S. Cities

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