Environment And Energy Collaborative Original reporting on energy and the environment from NPR and member station reporters around the country.

West Delta 105 E is an oil-producing platform located a dozen miles off the Louisiana coast in the Gulf of Mexico. A 2014 explosion on the lower deck killed Jerrel "Bubba" Hancock. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement hide caption

toggle caption
Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

8 Years After Deepwater Horizon Explosion, Is Another Disaster Waiting To Happen?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/603669896/604241558" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the control room of PJM Interconnection, employees monitor a power grid that stretches across the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic. PJM Interconnection hide caption

toggle caption
PJM Interconnection

After Alert On Russian Hacks, Bigger Push To Protect Power Grid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602252391/604245318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gas is pumped into vehicles at a BP gas station in Hoboken, N.J. in 2016.The Obama administration moved to nearly double fuel-economy standards by 2025, but the EPA now is moving to weaken them. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julio Cortez/AP

Andrew Wheeler during his November 2017 Senate confirmation hearing to be deputy administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. Alex Edelman/picture-alliance/dpa/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Edelman/picture-alliance/dpa/AP

"Keep it in the ground" activists protesting the Bayou Bridge Pipeline on February 17, 2018 near Belle Rose, Louisiana. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

toggle caption
Travis Lux/WWNO

'Keep It In The Ground' Activists Optimistic Despite Oil Boom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/589908135/595967467" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jim Barrett stands next to a well pad on his farm in Bradford County, Pa. He accuses Chesapeake Energy of cheating him out of royalty money. Marie Cusick/StateImpact Pennsylvania hide caption

toggle caption
Marie Cusick/StateImpact Pennsylvania

Professor Eric van Oort uses this 'virtual oil rig' to do research at the University of Texas at Austin. He helps advise companies on how to improve operations. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

toggle caption
Mose Buchele/KUT

America's Oil Boom Is Fueled By A Tech Boom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/591141384/592965483" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Revenue from wind farms has helped Dewey County, Oklahoma, fund local schools and pay off a new courthouse. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Tough Talk As Oklahoma's Wind Industry Becomes A Political Target

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/590877834/592424036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The offshore oil drilling platform called Gail, operated by Venoco, Inc., off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif., in 2009. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Carlson/AP

California May Have A Way To Block Trump's Offshore Drilling Push

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583407248/584181905" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Denver's newest skyscraper (center) followed new building codes for energy efficiency. The city wants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050. Dan Boyce for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Boyce for NPR

Despite Progress, Cities Struggle With Ambitious Climate Goals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583625833/583778481" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists are hoping that seagrasses could act as a buffer against acidifying oceans. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Sommer/KQED

Can Seagrass Save Shellfish From Climate Change?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/580999790/582513535" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A female gopher tortoise, about 20 years old, at the Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center near Newton, Ga. Todd Stone/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Todd Stone/AP

Business And Wildlife Groups Skip The Fight, Work Together To Save A Species

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/578689174/582240546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers pull pipes from an oil well in 2016 near Crescent, Okla. The oil industry wants to attract a new, more diverse generation of workers, but a history of racism and sexism makes that difficult. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
J Pat Carter/Getty Images

Big Oil Has A Diversity Problem

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/553969144/563133807" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At the SolarWorld manufacturing plant in Hillsboro, Ore., John Clason stacks solar cells before loading them into machines that build solar panels. Cassandra Profita/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

toggle caption
Cassandra Profita/Oregon Public Broadcasting

How Tariffs Could Help And Hurt The Solar Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/560501750/560920947" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An aerial photo shows hills of mining waste known as "chat" scattered throughout the abandoned lead and zinc mine at the Tar Creek Superfund site. Joe Wertz/Stateimpact Oklahoma hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Wertz/Stateimpact Oklahoma

EPA Vows To Speed Cleanup Of Toxic Superfund Sites Despite Funding Drop

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/554564288/556850508" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A solar energy panel is lifted into place in a solar energy field at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District in Rancho Cordova, Calif. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

California Lawmakers Debate 100 Percent Clean Energy Mandate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/551046066/551047997" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senior Airman Yazmine Nanasca with a control tower crew at Altus Air Force Base guide a C-17 cargo plane a KC-135 tanker as it taxis to the runway for a day-long training mission in southwestern Oklahoma. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

New Wind Farms Cause Friction In The Sky Over Military Flight Routes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/549549825/551897302" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An empty field is all that remains of Uravan after cleanup wrapped in 2007. Dan Boyce/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Boyce/NPR

Former Residents Picnic At Colorado Superfund Site

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/548663887/548715386" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Oil and gas operations near a subdivision in Firestone, Colo. RJ Sangosti/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
RJ Sangosti/Denver Post/Getty Images

Neighborhoods Worry About Living Amid Oil And Gas Development

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545583191/545803344" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mark Holohan, solar division manager at Wilson Electric, stands in his company's warehouse outside Phoenix, Ariz. Solar installers say a proposed tariff could sink their business model, while several solar manufacturers say they need shelter from an oversupply of cheap panels made overseas. Will Stone/KJZZ News hide caption

toggle caption
Will Stone/KJZZ News

In Solar Trade Dispute, Will Proposed Tariffs Cost Industry Jobs?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/544544791/545185559" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript