Environment And Energy Collaborative Original reporting on energy and the environment from NPR and member station reporters around the country.
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Environment And Energy Collaborative

Original reporting on climate, environment, and an energy system in transition.

April Alvarez, field director for Oregon's Farmworker Union PCUN, spoke at a Portland vigil to honor Sebastian Francisco Perez. The 38-year-old farmworker died during the late June heat wave. Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB hide caption

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Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

As Extreme Heat Kills Hundreds, Oregon Steps Up Push To Protect People

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Wind turbines in a field in Adair, Iowa. Democrats' budget deal would use financial carrots and sticks to encourage utilities to shift to clean energy. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Democrats' Budget Plan Pushes A Shift To Clean Energy. Here's How It Would Work

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A wall-mounted thermostat in a California home. New research finds households that can least afford it are spending more than they have to on electricity. Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images

Shalanda Baker listens during a confirmation hearing Tuesday to be Director of the Office of Minority Economic Impact for the Department of Energy. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

'Energy Justice' Nominee Brings Activist Voice To Biden's Climate Plans

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In February, Ricki Mills watches from her Dallas home as she waits for a fire hydrant to be turned on to get water. Texas lawmakers approved a package of measures aimed at addressing what went wrong during one of the worst power outages in U.S. history. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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Pictures of plaintiffs fly outside the court in The Hague, Netherlands, before Wednesday's ruling ordering Royal Dutch Shell to rein in its carbon emissions. Thousands of citizens joined the suit charging that Shell's fossil fuel investments endanger lives. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Colorado Snow Survey supervisor Brian Domonkos and civil engineer Madison Gutekunst of the USDA weigh snow to know how much moisture it holds on April 30, 2021. Michael Elizabeth Sakas/CPR News hide caption

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Michael Elizabeth Sakas/CPR News

Melting Snow Usually Means Water For The West. But This Year, It Might Not Be Enough

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Treated Denver wastewater flows into the South Platte River in April. In what may be the largest U.S. project of its kind, Denver will use excess energy from sewage wastewater to heat and cool a new agriculture, arts and education center. Hart Van Denburg/CPR News hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR News

How Your Hot Showers And Toilet Flushes Can Help the Climate

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A roller coaster that once sat on the Funtown Pier in Seaside Heights, N.J., rests in the ocean on Oct. 31, 2012, after the pier was washed away by Hurricane Sandy. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

A lift boat and wind turbines off Block Island, R.I., in 2016. Approval of the country's first large-scale wind farm off Martha's Vineyard signals a major shift in the clean energy landscape. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

The Royal Dutch Shell refinery is seen in Norco, La. The state is a major petrochemical and oil and gas producer, but Gov. John Bel Edwards has called for a plan to dramatically reduce climate warming emissions. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, joined by Sens. Ed Markey (left) and Martin Heinrich, discusses legislation in April to reimpose regulations to reduce methane pollution from oil and gas wells. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Biden Signs Bill To Restore Regulations On Climate-Warming Methane Emissions

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Shawn Steffee is business agent at Boilermakers Local 154 in Pittsburgh, and worries a transition to clean energy could cost him pay and hurt his pension. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

Biden Says His Climate Plan Means Jobs. Some Union Members Are Skeptical

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A pedestrian using an umbrella to get some relief from the sun walks past a sign displaying the temperature on June 20, 2017, in Phoenix. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

Your Weather Forecast Update: Warmer Climate Will Be The New 'Normal'

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Three of Deepwater Wind's turbines stand off Block Island, R.I., in 2016. The Biden administration is pushing for a sharp increase in offshore wind energy development along the East Coast. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

U.S. bald eagle populations have more than quadrupled in the lower 48 states since 2009, according to a new survey from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A thin strip of sand is all that stands between multimillion-dollar homes on the Southern California coast and a rising Pacific Ocean. A state bill aims to buy, then rent out such properties until they're no longer habitable. Axel Koester/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Axel Koester/Corbis via Getty Images

California Has A New Idea For Homes At Risk From Rising Seas: Buy, Rent, Retreat

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