Environment And Energy Collaborative Original reporting on energy and the environment from NPR and member station reporters around the country.
Special Series

Environment And Energy Collaborative

Original reporting on climate, environmental policy, and an energy system in transition.

Range Resources was sued over the effects of drilling Washington County, Pa., in 2012. Reid R. Frazier/The Allegheny Front/StateImpact Pennsylvania hide caption

toggle caption
Reid R. Frazier/The Allegheny Front/StateImpact Pennsylvania

Solar panels cover cars parked in a lot nearby Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta. The city aims to rely largely on renewable energy by 2035. Jaime Henry-White/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jaime Henry-White/AP

Denise Brinley is executive director at the Pennsylvania Governor's Office of Energy. The state produces "playbooks" to highlight ways old coal power plant sites could be redeveloped. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Finding New Opportunity For Old Coal-Fired Power Plant Sites

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/724454774/726294719" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt was among the most controversial of President Trump's original Cabinet-level picks. Pete Marovich/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pete Marovich/Getty Images

Entering the control room at Three Mile Island Unit 1 is like stepping back in time. Except for a few digital screens and new counters, much of the equipment is original to 1974, when the plant began generating electricity. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Brady/NPR

Artist rendering of NuScale Power's nuclear power plant design, which would use small modular reactors. NuScale Power hide caption

toggle caption
NuScale Power

This Company Says The Future Of Nuclear Energy Is Smaller, Cheaper And Safer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/720728055/722551014" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Once it is safe to remove the spent fuel from the pool, it's stored outside in metal casks. They are lined up on a concrete base, behind razor wire and against a hillside near the power plant. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Olivia Sun/NPR

As Nuclear Waste Piles Up, Private Companies Pitch New Ways To Store It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716837443/718546561" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The offshore oil drilling platform 'Gail,' operated by Venoco, Inc., is shown off the coast of Santa Barbara, Calif. in 2009. A Trump administration plan to greatly expand offshore drilling is on hold after a setback in court. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Carlson/AP

A drilling rig at work near a residential neighborhood in Erie, Colo. An overhaul of oil and gas regulations will give localities more control over where drilling can happen. Grace Hood/CPR hide caption

toggle caption
Grace Hood/CPR

Colorado's Oil And Gas Regulators Must Now Consider Public Health And Safety

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/712877704/713842532" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alaska's Ice Roads Are Melting Early This Year, With Devastating Consequences

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/712409233/712409234" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The shuttered San Onofre power plant is one of California's two nuclear power plants located near active earthquake faults. Spent nuclear fuel is being stored there currently. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement are using Ian MacDonald's data to estimate the amount of oil being spilled at the Taylor Energy site. Tegan Wendland/WWNO hide caption

toggle caption
Tegan Wendland/WWNO

This Oil Spill Has Been Leaking Into The Gulf For 14 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/711085901/711646296" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

David Bernhardt, a former oil and gas lobbyist, speaks before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee at his confirmation hearing to head the Interior Department, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March 28, 2019. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A historical marker commemorates the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island — the most serious in U.S. history. To the left are the cooling towers for the mothballed Unit 2 reactor, which partially melted down. Joanne Cassaro/WITF hide caption

toggle caption
Joanne Cassaro/WITF

40 Years After A Partial Nuclear Meltdown, A New Push To Keep Three Mile Island Open

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707000226/707509505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LED lightbulbs have replaced many incandescent ones. Now, the Trump administration wants to reverse an Obama-era rule designed to make a wide array of other lightbulbs more efficient. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP

Trump Administration Dims Rule On Energy Efficient Lightbulbs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/705887181/706780650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At Toyota's LFA Works plant in Japan, the automaker manufactures 10 Mirai hydrogen fuel cell cars a day. It has plans to ramp up production. Hiroo Saso hide caption

toggle caption
Hiroo Saso

Japan Is Betting Big On The Future Of Hydrogen Cars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/700877189/704562495" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hundreds of schoolchildren take part in a climate protest in Hong Kong Friday. So-called 'school strikes' were planned in more than 100 countries and territories, including the U.S., to protest governments' failure to act against global warming. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kin Cheung/AP

Skipping School Around The World To Push For Action On Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/703461293/703687140" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pumpjacks like this one dot the desert of southeast New Mexico, as oil and gas companies rush to develop one of the largest oil reserves in the world. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nathan Rott/NPR

In Midst Of An Oil Boom, New Mexico Sets Bold New Climate Goals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/702877664/703052647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Diversion facilities like this one help protect endangered fish in California. Environmentalists say such protections would be weakened under a Trump administration plan to send more water to the state's farmers. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Trump Administration Shortcuts Science To Give California Farmers More Water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/701205836/702355751" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jason Salfi, left, and Dr. David Erickson, right, of Dimensional Energy, are finalists in the Carbon XPRIZE. They stand in front of the Dry Fork Station coal-fired power plant in Gillette, Wyo., where the competition is located. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio

In Wyoming, A Contest To Capture Carbon And Save Coal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/697171440/700512147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript