Environment And Energy Collaborative Original reporting on energy and the environment from NPR and member station reporters around the country.
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Environment And Energy Collaborative

Original reporting on climate, environment, and an energy system in transition.

Wyoming Doubles Down On Its Long Support For Carbon Capture

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It's Not Just Wildfires. Climate Change Is Making The Air More Hazardous

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Frances Acuña drives through southeast Austin with a sensor attached to her driver's side door. It's part of a federal study to measure rising urban heat. Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT News hide caption

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Gabriel C. Pérez/KUT News

Donald Trump Jr. posted this photo of himself on Facebook in 2014. He tweeted his opposition to Alaska's Pebble Mine this month, noting its potential harm to a salmon fishery. Via Facebook hide caption

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Via Facebook

Pump jacks work in a field near Lovington, N.M., in 2015. The Trump administration is lifting an Obama-era rule aimed at limiting emissions of methane, a potent climate-warming gas. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Trump's Methane Rollback That Big Oil Doesn't Want

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Some rafting companies outside of Yellowstone National Park are having record-breaking years despite the coronavirus pandemic. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

'We Had To Get Out': Despite The Risks, Business Is Booming At National Parks

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Not your grandmother's nuclear reactor. A drawing of Oklo's proposed Aurora nuclear power plant, which would produce enough electricity for about 1000 homes. Oklo hide caption

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Oklo

Smaller Nuclear Plants May Come With Less Stringent Safety Rules

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West Atlanta resident Harriet Feggins has been out of work since March because of the pandemic. So far she has managed to pay her electric bill by scraping together odd jobs and dipping into her 401(k). "I'm trying to do everything I can," she says, but she worries it won't be enough. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

'Tidal Wave' Of Power Shut-Offs Looms As Nation Grapples With Heat

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President Trump proposes changes to the National Environmental Policy Act at the White House in January. The final rules aims to speed approval of pipelines and other infrastructure. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Crew members shovel pollock onboard a trawler on the Bering Sea. The fishing industry has been hit by COVID-19, but the federal agency that manages it has banned mention of the pandemic without preapproval. Nat Herz/Alaska's Energy Desk hide caption

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Nat Herz/Alaska's Energy Desk

The Freightliner eCascadia and the eM2 are two of the first electric semitrucks to hit the highways for test-driving. Courtesy of Daimler Trucks North America hide caption

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Courtesy of Daimler Trucks North America

The closer humans are to animals, the greater the opportunity for zoonotic spillover, where a pathogen jumps from animal to human. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

President Barack Obama signs the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2009, in Denver. Gerald Herbert/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Absent From Stimulus Packages: Overhauling Energy, Climate Programs

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President Trump proposes changes to the National Environmental Policy Act in January. His latest executive order allows agencies to waive requirements of the bedrock law to speed up infrastructure projects. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The ancient Gondwana Rainforests of Australia were damaged by recent wildfires. A new study finds the world lost roughly one-third of its old growth forest in the past century. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Because of the pandemic, the Bureau of Land Management held virtual public hearings in April on a proposal to expand oil drilling in Alaska's North Slope. U.S. Department of the Interior / screenshot by NPR hide caption

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U.S. Department of the Interior / screenshot by NPR
Stephanie Adeline/NPR

Our Pandemic Habits Cut Carbon Emissions, But It's Not Clear They'll Last

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An idle pump jack near Karnes City, Texas, last month. The industry has been divided over a proposal to limit production amid a devastating drop in demand and prices since the pandemic shutdown. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Energy analysts say coal use is down so much that some power plants might run out of room to stockpile it. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front