1968: How We Got Here It was a remarkable year that brought upheaval and progress on civil rights, politics, and technology. And helps us explain how we got where we are today, 50 years later.

Extending gloved hands skyward in racial protest, U.S. athletes Smith and Carlos stare downward during the playing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" at the Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City on Oct. 16, 1968. AP hide caption

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Those Raised Fists Still Resonate, 50 Years Later

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Mexican President-elect Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, center, stands Tuesday with Ana Ignacia Rodríguez Marquez, a former leader of the student movement of 1968, at a ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 Tlatelolco massacre, at the Tres Culturas square in Mexico City. Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images

What's Changed Since Mexico's Bloody Crackdown On 1968 Student Protests?

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"Harper Valley P.T.A." was a sassy, country-pop song that captured the anger many women felt about double standards they faced in 1968. William Lovelace/Getty Images hide caption

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William Lovelace/Getty Images

50 Years Of Sockin' It To The PTA

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Joel Silver is far left in the black t-shirt and sunglasses. And Buzzy Hellring is in the middle (under the cup) also in the black t-shirt and sunglasses. Courtesy of Heidi Hellring hide caption

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Courtesy of Heidi Hellring

1968 Created The 'Ultimate' Anti-Sport Sport

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Revisiting The 1968 Republican Convention

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Pope Paul VI acknowledges cheers as standing on platform in Bogota, Colombia, on Aug. 22, 1968. AP hide caption

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50 Years Ago, The Pope Called Birth Control 'Intrinsically Wrong'

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One of several murals of Robert Kennedy is displayed at the Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools in Los Angeles. Kyle Grillot for NPR hide caption

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Kyle Grillot for NPR

50 Years After His Death, Making RFK More Than A Ghost And A Mural

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Robert F. Kennedy stands in an open-top convertible and shakes hands with members of a crowd as he campaigns for the democratic Presidential nomination in Detroit on May 15, 1968. Andrew Sacks/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Sacks/Getty Images

The Education Of Bobby Kennedy — On Race

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What Gun Violence Protesters Can Learn From 1968's Chicano Blowouts

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A man flies the French tricolor flag over crowds marching to the Arc de Triomphe during the Paris students' strike. Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Central Press/Getty Images

In France, The Protests Of May 1968 Reverberate Today — And Still Divide The French

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David Kennerly says this 1968 photo of his, taken in Los Angeles at the beginning of Robert F. Kennedy's presidential campaign, captures what it meant to cover the chaotic and carefree period as a photojournalist. "Everybody could get close, everybody wanted to," he says. David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hume Kennerly/Getty Images

The mule train comes into the Washington area against a late afternoon sky in June of 1968. The caravan left Marks, Miss., for the nation's capital on May 13 to participate in the Poor People's Campaign. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Bob Daugherty/AP

How A Mule Train From Marks, Miss., Kicked Off MLK's Poor People Campaign

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Actors rehearse a dance scene for the 1968 London production of the musical Hair. Larry Ellis/Getty Images hide caption

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Larry Ellis/Getty Images

'Hair' At 50: Going Gray, But Its Youthful Optimism Remains Bouncy And Full-Bodied

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Britain's Conservative Party politician Enoch Powell, right, listens to two demonstrators in Canada in April 1968, reading a petition that describes him as a "racist." AP hide caption

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An Anti-Immigration Speech Divided Britain 50 Years Ago. It Still Echoes Today

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Coretta Scott King, center, accompanied by the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, her children, and singer Harry Belafonte, leads a march in Memphis to honor her husband who was assassinated four days earlier. AP hide caption

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After MLK's Death, Coretta Scott King Went To Memphis To Finish His Work

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Fire shoots out from a Baltimore store on Gay Street as looting erupted in a five-block business section in Baltimore on April 6, 1968. Police sealed off the area. AP hide caption

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50 Years Ago Baltimore Burned. The Same Issues Set It Aflame In 2015

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Bobby Hutton: The Killing That Catapulted The Black Panthers To Fame

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The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., on April 3, 1968, a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King and Ralph Abernathy. Charles Kelly/AP hide caption

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Charles Kelly/AP

Despite Swirl Of Conspiracy Theories, Investigators Say The MLK Case Is Closed

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Remembering Robert F. Kennedy's Speech After Martin Luther King's Assassination

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