Blackout In Puerto Rico For a decade, the nation's largest banks made millions as Puerto Rico approached financial ruin. Then, with the island's infrastructure crumbling and vulnerable, a category 4 hurricane came barreling in.
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Blackout In Puerto Rico

U.S. Army soldiers pass out water, provided by FEMA, to residents in a neighborhood without grid electricity or running water in San Isidro, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 17, 2017. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

U.S. Army soldiers in Puerto Rico unload food on Oct. 17, 2017. Nearly a month after Hurricane Maria hit, the federal government was still delivering basic supplies, like food and water. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

FEMA Blamed Delays In Puerto Rico On Maria; Agency Records Tell Another Story

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Jaime Degraff sits outside on Sept. 23, 2017, as he waits for the Puerto Rican electrical grid to be fixed after Hurricane Maria. The island is still struggling with power outages. Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press hide caption

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Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press

How Puerto Rico's Debt Created A Perfect Storm Before The Storm

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