With Temperatures Rising, How Do Humans Cope? As the earth's climate heats up, the challenges for humans mount.
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Heat: Coping With A Warming World

Old-Growth Forests May Help Songbirds Cope With Warming Climate

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Shifts in temperature are leading to shifts in the wedding industry as bakers, photographers, florists and the couples they serve think about how to beat the heat on this all-important day. JGI/Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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JGI/Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Blend Images

Say 'I Do' Without The Sweat: Wedding Pros Share How They Beat The Heat

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On a blistering hot day in southern California, construction workers carry large bottles of water during a break. Experts predict more intense and more frequent heat events across the country in coming decades, with huge implications for both indoor and outdoor workers. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

Mario Ramos (left) and wife Tally adjust their umbrellas in Laguna Beach, Calif. The state was among a number of places this summer that experienced their highest temperatures on record. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Benji and Lori White check on a small herd of Red Angus at their ranch, B&L Red Angus, near Putnam, Okla. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

The Arid West Moves East, With Big Implications For Agriculture

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New technologies and a changing climate are altering the way apples are grown in places like New York's Hudson Valley and across the country. Jake Rajs/Getty Images hide caption

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Jake Rajs/Getty Images

A Few More Bad Apples: As The Climate Changes, Fruit Growing Does, Too

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Fisherman Darius Kasprzak searches for cod in the Gulf of Alaska. The cod population there is at its lowest level on record. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Feidt for NPR

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

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Francesco Zorzi for NPR

Why A Drop Of 4 Degrees Made A Big Difference For A Garment Maker's Bottom Line

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A yellow-bellied marmot keeps an eye out while it gets a bite to eat. Related to groundhogs, yellow-bellied marmots are getting fatter and bigger because of the longer growing season brought on by climate change. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Spring Is Springing Sooner, Throwing Nature's Rhythms Out Of Whack

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The way cows digest food takes a lot of energy and generates a lot of heat. This makes them lose their appetite and produce less milk. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

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Mose Buchele/KUT

As Milk Production Cools In Summer, Farmers Try To Help Cows Take The Heat

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Marcus Butt / Ikon/Getty Images

Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too

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Matt Mawson/Getty Images

Phoenix Tries To Reverse Its 'Silent Storm' Of Heat Deaths

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