Featured Stories A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

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Finnish conductor Klaus Mäkelä has just been announced as the next music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Francois Guillot/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Guillot/AFP via Getty Images

28-year-old conductor Klaus Mäkelä will lead the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

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Composer Anna Clyne — one of the most performed living composers — embraces melody in her music as a vehicle to connect with listeners. Christina Kernohan/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Christina Kernohan/Courtesy of the artist

Composer Julia Perry, photographed in Florence, Italy, in 1957 after she won her second Guggenheim fellowship. David Lees/Getty Images hide caption

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David Lees/Getty Images

Rediscovering the rigor of composers Julia Perry and Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson

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Four years after the death of frontman Riley Gale, Power Trip surprised fans onstage at Mohawk in Austin, featuring a new vocalist. Samantha Tellez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Samantha Tellez/Courtesy of the artist

Beck as seen in his 1994 video for the song "Loser." Youtube screen grab by NPR hide caption

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Youtube screen grab by NPR

Beck's 'Loser' at 30 and the golden age of slacker rock

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Inside Long Island's UBS Arena on Feb. 9, Ye commands the crowd at a massive listening event for Vultures 1. His new collab with Ty Dolla $ign is now a No. 1. album. Jason Martinez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Jason Martinez/Courtesy of the artist

George Gershwin, photographed in his 72nd Street apartment in New York in 1934. His Rhapsody in Blue premiered 100 years ago on Feb. 12, 1924. PhotoQuest / Contributor/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoQuest / Contributor/Getty Images

'Rhapsody in Blue': After a century, Gershwin's musical melting pot still resonates

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Usher performs at the grand opening for his Las Vegas residency, "My Way," on July 15, 2022, at the Dolby Live amphitheater at the Park MGM Hotel and Casino. Denise Truscello/Getty Images for Dolby Live at Park MGM hide caption

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Denise Truscello/Getty Images for Dolby Live at Park MGM

Laufey performs during the December 2023 event A New York Evening With Laufey, at The Greene Space in downtown Manhattan. Rob Kim/Getty Images for The Recording Academy hide caption

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Rob Kim/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Green Day's latest album, Saviors, arrived as the group is celebrating the 20th anniversary of American Idiot and 30th anniversary of Dookie. Alice Baxley / Apple Music/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Alice Baxley / Apple Music/Courtesy of the artist

Why we still love Green Day

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Unionized staff picket outside the Condé Nast offices in New York on Jan. 23. The company is merging the popular digital music publication Pitchfork with the men's magazine GQ, which has triggered anger over the resulting layoffs and concern for the outlet's future. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Harry Belafonte, alongside Ed Sullivan, signs autographs for fans outside CBS Studio 50 in New York City, circa 1955. Archive Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Archive Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
John Rogers/Getty Images

In Memoriam 2023: The Musicians We Lost

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Maria Callas as Rosina in Rossini's Il Barbieri di Siviglia, at Milan's La Scala theater in 1956. Erio Piccagliani/Teatro alla Scala hide caption

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Erio Piccagliani/Teatro alla Scala

Maria Callas: The soprano of the century

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What Now, the second solo album from Brittany Howard, is out Feb. 9. Bobbi Rich/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Bobbi Rich/Courtesy of the artist

Brittany Howard is going to make her dreams come true

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On this week's Alt.Latino, an exploration of the rise of regional Mexican music. Jackie Lay/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Lay/NPR

The result of the improvised sessions that led to New Blue Sun is subtle but daring. Mainly because it flies in the face of everything we've come to expect, and selfishly demand, as André 3000 fans. Kai Regan/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Kai Regan/Courtesy of the artist

Listen: The NPR Music interview with André 3000

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The new album of music by Estonian composer Arvo Pärt is a warm blanket of comfort in troubled times. Luciano Rossetti/ECM Records hide caption

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Luciano Rossetti/ECM Records

A disciplined plea for peace – and quiet – from composer Arvo Pärt

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