The Disappeared: China's Draconian Imprisonment Of A People A special series about China's mass detention of members of the Uighur minority.
Special Series

The Disappeared: China's Draconian Imprisonment Of A People

Kalida Akytkhan, pictured with her son Parkhat Rakhymbergen, has two sons and two daughter-in-laws who have been detained in re-education camps in Xinjiang. She brought photos of her family to the offices of rights organization Atazhurt in Almaty. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Families Of The Disappeared: A Search For Loved Ones Held In China's Xinjiang Region

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Uighur security personnel patrol near the Id Kah Mosque in Kashgar, a city in northwestern China's Xinjiang region, in 2017. Xinjiang authorities have detained members of the Uighur ethnic minority, who are largely Muslim, and held them in camps the authorities call "education and training centers." Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Ex-Detainee Describes Torture In China's Xinjiang Re-Education Camp

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Mir, a Pakistani man who used to live in Xinjiang, China, clutches the hands of his two daughters. Since Chinese authorities detained his wife, he's been raising their two girls alone. "My mind just won't work," he says. "I sound incoherent, I can't think, I even forget what to say in my prayers." Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

'My Family Has Been Broken': Pakistanis Fear For Uighur Wives Held In China

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An ethnic Kazakh woman tried to cancel her Chinese citizenship after she married and moved to Kazakhstan. When she crossed back into China last year, the problems began. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

'They Ordered Me To Get An Abortion': A Chinese Woman's Ordeal In Xinjiang

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