Parkland School Shooting, One Year Later Feb. 14, 2019 marks one year since the deadly mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.
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Parkland School Shooting, One Year Later

Suzanne Devine Clark, an art teacher at Deerfield Beach Elementary School, places painted stones at a memorial outside Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on the first anniversary of the school shooting Thursday. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Gabriel Patten, 18, a student at Castlemont High School in East Oakland, Calif., is a member of an Oakland-based violence intervention program called Youth ALIVE! He remembers when one of the program counselors was shot just outside the school. James Tensuan for NPR hide caption

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James Tensuan for NPR

It's Been A Minute: Oakland Kids Who Experience Gun Violence Every Day

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Thousands of people participate in the March for Our Lives protest in New York City in March 2018. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

NRA Facing Most Formidable Opposition Yet, A Year After Parkland

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Marjory Stoneman Douglas senior and March for Our Lives co-founder Jaclyn Corin sits at the March for Our Lives office in Florida. Though Corin admits that at times she feels emotionally drained from all the ups and downs of the past year, she describes it overall as "monumental." Scott McIntyre for NPR hide caption

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Scott McIntyre for NPR

Parkland Student Survivors Brace For 1st Anniversary Of School Shooting

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After his company's response to the Parkland shooting, Dick's Sporting Goods CEO Ed Stack became an unlikely corporate face of gun control. Scott Dalton/Invision for DICK'S Sporting Goods/AP Images hide caption

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Scott Dalton/Invision for DICK'S Sporting Goods/AP Images

Soul-Searching After Parkland, Dick's CEO Embraces Tougher Stance On Guns

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One year after Carmen's death, April Schentrup stands beside a photograph of her daughter that was used during her funeral but now rests in the family's new home. April, who worked as an elementary school principal near Parkland, Fla., now advocates for gun reform. Alyse Young for NPR hide caption

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Alyse Young for NPR

Parkland Family Reflects On A Year Of Anguish And Activism

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Thousands of people watch as the temple by renowned Burning Man artist Best is set ablaze on March 21, 2015, in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

To Honor Parkland Victims, David Best Is Building A Temple, Then Setting It On Fire

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Ariel Davis for NPR

School Shooters: What's Their Path To Violence?

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Maya Altman and her mother, Robyn Altman, visit StoryCorps in Parkland, Fla., to reflect on the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Madison Mullen/StoryCorps hide caption

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Madison Mullen/StoryCorps

A Year After Parkland, A Mother And Daughter Remember

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