Civility Wars NPR series on civility.
Special Series

Civility Wars

Tim Foley, the founder of Arizona Border Recon and Maggie Milinovitch, the co-owner of La Gitana Cantina, both live in the small border town of Arivaca, Ariz. The recent militia group presence has put strains on a town that has long prided itself on its live-and-let-live, cooperative spirit. Dominic Valente for NPR hide caption

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Dominic Valente for NPR

Militias Test The Civility Of An Arizona Border Town

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Talking about controversial topics with your political opposite can feel like an exercise in futility. One tip, experts say, is to establish common ground as quickly as you can. Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

How President Trump's Angry Tweets Can Ripple Across Social Media

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"We're trying to build a community that puts into practice what it really means to love your neighbors," says Christopher Edmonston, White Memorial Presbyterian Church's senior pastor. Tom Gjelten/NPR hide caption

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Tom Gjelten/NPR

Pastoring A Purple Church: 'I Absolutely Bite My Tongue Sometimes'

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Khadijah Ameen, 29, a woman who voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016, was among the participants of a weekend-long workshop with a dozen people of varying political views. Courtesy of the National Institute for Civil Discourse and New Voice Strategies hide caption

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Courtesy of the National Institute for Civil Discourse and New Voice Strategies

How Portland Is Dealing With Civil Protest Escalating To Civil Unrest

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Deadly violence from a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., shook the nation in 2017. Since then, city leaders have struggled to define what public discourse should look like as once-marginalized voices increase demands for change. Justin T. Gellerson for NPR hide caption

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Justin T. Gellerson for NPR

'Hear Me By Any Means Necessary': Charlottesville Is Forced To Redefine Civility

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LA Johnson/NPR

When Civility Is Used As A Cudgel Against People Of Color

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Annelise Capossela for NPR

In These Divided Times, Is Civility Under Siege?

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