Faith And Power: How Hindu Nationalism Is Changing India How Hindu Nationalism is changing India.
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Faith And Power: How Hindu Nationalism Is Changing India

Tobiron Nessa, 45, is the only member of her immediate family whom the Indian government recognizes as a citizen. Her husband and five children have all been left off the National Register of Citizens even though she says all have Indian birth certificates. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Millions In India Face Uncertain Future After Being Left Off Citizenship List

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Members of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, or RSS, stand at attention and salute a saffron-orange flag at a morning shakha, or drill session, in a park in suburban Mumbai, India. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

The Powerful Group Shaping The Rise Of Hindu Nationalism In India

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Some of the products on sale at Umesh Sonia's boutique in Mumbai include bottles of distilled cow urine, soap made from cow dung, floor disinfectant made from cow urine, under-eye gel and toothpaste made from cow excrement. This is part of a growing retail market in India. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

In India, Ayurveda Is A Booming Business

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Satendra Das, 80, is the chief priest in waiting for the Ram temple, which has not yet been built in Ayodhya. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Nearly 27 Years After Hindu Mob Destroyed A Mosque, The Scars In India Remain Deep

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The name of India's Mughalsarai railway station, near Varanasi, was changed last year to Deen Dayal Upadhyaya, for a right-wing Hindu leader who died there in 1968. Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg via Getty Images

India Is Changing Some Cities' Names, And Muslims Fear Their Heritage Is Being Erased

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Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks with of Yogi Adityanath (left), a Hindu priest who is chief minister of Uttar Pradesh, during a campaign rally on March 28. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

With Indian Elections Underway, The Vote Is Also A Referendum On Hindu Nationalism

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