Life After ISIS: The Struggle And Survival Of Yazidis Stories of an ancient minority community that has been targeted by the Islamic State.
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Life After ISIS: The Struggle And Survival Of Yazidis

Jeelan, 11, the day after being rescued from an ISIS family who had held her captive for the past two years. She says she doesn't remember her Yazidi family. "I want to go back to Um Ali," she says, referring to the Iraqi woman who had been pretending to be her mother in a detention camp for ISIS families. "Um Ali is my real family." Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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'I Want To Go Back': The Yazidi Girls Who Did Not Want To Be Rescued From ISIS

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Caregiver Fajriya Khaled holds a child at an orphanage in northeastern Syria, home to 41 children of Yazidi mothers and ISIS fathers. The Yazidi community in Iraq forces the women to leave their children behind if they want to return home. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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In Syria, An Orphanage Cares For Children Born To Yazidi Mothers Enslaved By ISIS

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Ibrahim, 2, in northeastern Syria a few hours after his freed Yazidi mother returned to Iraq without him. Ibrahim's father was an ISIS fighter. Although his mother wanted to take him home, the Yazidis do not allow children of ISIS fathers to live with the community. Iraqi law considers the children Muslim rather than Yazidi. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Freed From ISIS, Yazidi Mothers Face Wrenching Choice: Abandon Kids Or Never Go Home

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Mazen (right), 13, and his brother Mezban in a camp for displaced Yazidis in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Mazen was freed recently, five years after being kidnapped by ISIS. He was found in Baghouz, the last ISIS stronghold in Syria. His brother was also kidnapped and, 2-1/2 years ago, was rescued with their mother. The boys' father is still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Freed From ISIS, Few Yazidis Return To Suffering Families, Many Remain Missing

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Saeed Ahmed Khalaf, left, and his family live in a tent on Mount Sinjar. He believes the U.S. would either help protect the Yazidis in Sinjar or help the group emigrate to a safe place. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Yazidis Remain In Fear On Iraq's Mount Sinjar After Attempted Genocide

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Najla Hussin and her mother at their makeshift home in a village of displaced Yazidis near Dohuk in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Yazidi Women Finally Go To School, Defying Former ISIS Rulers — And Their Own Parents

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A Yazidi tomb in a village in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. Many families were displaced when ISIS killed hundreds of men and kidnapped thousands of women and children. More than 3,000 Yazidis are still missing. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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This Man Has Freed Hundreds Of Yazidis Captured By ISIS. Thousands Remain Missing

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