Getting To Zero Carbon: The Climate Challenge Is it really possible to bring carbon emissions down to zero — widely recognized as a necessary move to slow the rise of global temperatures?
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Getting To Zero Carbon: The Climate Challenge

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Give Up Your Gas Stove To Save The Planet? Banning Gas Is The Next Climate Push

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A Pipistrel Taurus Electro electric two-seat airplane flies above Ajdovscina, Slovenia. Jure Makovec/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jure Makovec/AFP/Getty Images

With An Eye Toward Lower Emissions, Clean Air Travel Gets Off The Ground

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Jason Carney designed and installed the solar array on the roof of his house in Nashville, Tenn. He wants to introduce more people in minority communities to the advantages of solar energy. Tamara Reynolds for NPR hide caption

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Tamara Reynolds for NPR

Stepping Into The Sun: A Mission To Bring Solar Energy To Communities Of Color

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Container ships and other maritime vessels currently run on pollutant-intensive heavy fuel oil. The world's largest container-shipping company, Maersk, has promised to make its operations zero carbon by 2050. Doing so will require using new fuels such as hydrogen. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Dawn Of Low-Carbon Shipping

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The Danish company Maersk has been shipping goods around the world since the age of steamships. Now it wants to usher in a new era, with carbon neutral transport. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hecker/Getty Images

Giant Shipper Bets Big On Ending Its Carbon Emissions. Will It Pay Off?

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An aerial view of the 52-megawatt solar farm built by Silicon Ranch in Hazlehurst, Ga. Ever cheaper and better solar technology, available land and lots of sunshine are driving demand for massive, utility-scale solar projects across the American Southeast. Silicon Ranch hide caption

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Silicon Ranch

How Georgia Became A Surprising Bright Spot In The U.S. Solar Industry

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In California's Mojave Desert sits First Solar Inc.'s Desert Sunlight Solar Farm. California is among the states leading the decarbonization charge. Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Going 'Zero Carbon' Is All The Rage. But Will It Slow Climate Change?

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