Turning The Tables: Maybelle Carter A key player in country music's "Big Bang," an innovative guitarist who changed the role of the instrument and the matriarch of country's first family.

Maybelle Carter joined with the Carter Family in 1926. GAB Archive/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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GAB Archive/Redferns/Getty Images

The World Of Maybelle Carter: A Turning The Tables Playlist

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Lydia Mendoza had one of the most extensive performance careers for Mexican American women singers and an immense recording archive. Listeners to border radio in the 1930s would have heard her music alongside that of Maybelle Carter. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

XET Station Break, Introduction, Theme Song/The Wandering Boy

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In the 1930s, when Maybelle Carter (left) was touring with her cousin Sara (center) and Sara's husband A.P. Carter as the Carter Family, the members of the group still labored on the family farm in Poor Valley, in southern Virginia. Donaldson Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Donaldson Collection/Getty Images

Maybelle Carter, playing her autoharp, performs with her daughter, Helen. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Alexander/Getty Images

For Women Musicians, Maybelle Carter Set The Standard And Broke The Mold

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